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canid
06-02-2010, 03:26
This is a really great site I found that tells how you can tell fake minerals from authentic ones.

http://www.the-vug.com/vug/vugfakes.html

Le Fanu
06-02-2010, 03:30
Wow! Love that site! I was about to post here enquiring about how to tell whether amber is fake. My local new age shop has a great block of amber with a fly trapped in it, which could very easily be resin (and isn't cheap).

Not sure how I'll find out. I don't think amber is listed on this site!

cardlady22
06-02-2010, 04:00
Is this (http://www.ambergallery.com/Is_it_real_amber_/is_it_real_amber_.html) article helpful?

photokat
06-02-2010, 05:45
Love it - thank you!

canid
06-02-2010, 06:56
Wow! Love that site! I was about to post here enquiring about how to tell whether amber is fake. My local new age shop has a great block of amber with a fly trapped in it, which could very easily be resin (and isn't cheap).

Not sure how I'll find out. I don't think amber is listed on this site!

Oh, I know that one! First of all, it floats in salt water. Just mix your own & put the amber in it. Also, 'The word "elektron" in Greek means amber, a "natural plastic material". It was known that when amber was rubbed with dry cloth--producing what now one would call static electricity--it could attract light objects, such as bits of paper.' It works. Tear a teeny tiny bit of tissue, rub the amber vigorously on on fabric - it'll pick up the tissue if it's real amber, but you've got to do it quick. Sometimes if you rub it hard you can smell pine resin.

morticia monroe
06-02-2010, 07:05
Oh, I know that one! First of all, it floats in salt water. Just mix your own & put the amber in it. Also, 'The word "elektron" in Greek means amber, a "natural plastic material". It was known that when amber was rubbed with dry cloth--producing what now one would call static electricity--it could attract light objects, such as bits of paper.' It works. Tear a teeny tiny bit of tissue, rub the amber vigorously on on fabric - it'll pick up the tissue if it's real amber, but you've got to do it quick. Sometimes if you rub it hard you can smell pine resin.


Good to know,,,it will keep me from putting fire to my grandmother's necklace. ;)

Le Fanu
06-02-2010, 07:34
Tear a teeny tiny bit of tissue, rub the amber vigorously on on fabric - it'll pick up the tissue if it's real amber, but you've got to do it quick. Sometimes if you rub it hard you can smell pine resin.
Wonderful! Of all the suggestions, this is the only one I can feasibly do in a shop. Hope the shop owner doesn't take offence...

Great link, cardlady! Unfortunately, those are difficult to try before buying!

MCsea
06-02-2010, 07:45
Thank you for the fantastic link!

MARINA

cardlady22
06-02-2010, 11:45
Great link, cardlady! Unfortunately, those are difficult to try before buying!One of the down sides to gemstone/mineral ID. Most test methods are potentially damaging or involve special equipment. Not too helpful to the average casual buyer.

BYOB ~ Bring Your Own Buddy! :laugh:
Ahhh, I miss the gem shows.

Briar Rose
06-02-2010, 12:46
I remember watching, 20/20 with Joan London. She was out to spot the fakes, and went into mall jewelry stores (the ones that we love and trust; not!). Some of the stones were fakes with colored gel in between quartz. I will never forget that show. The sales associates had no idea, and after that they weren't allowed to speak on camera.

Also, she had her gem tested (bought from a mall jewelry shop), and her heart broke when she was told that the expenisve gem was a fake! She called the store on it, and they had nothing to say. I'll never forget that.

I remember working in a so-called upscale jewerly shop. I had wet a cloth to clean a necklace of ruby rondelle's ($3500), and the cloth was white when I started, and pinky-red when I finished.