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Graymalkin
09-02-2011, 12:16
I never used Charcoal incense before nor have I used Frankincense resin (other than stick/oil form) and I was wondering how to go about it? I tried it earlier and it ended up smelling kinda bad and melted the resin. :(

Caedryn
09-02-2011, 12:40
I do not know what you mean by charcoal incense.

Frankincense has a really nice fragrant odour to it (at least I think it does).

Get charcoal that is for burning incense on...(maybe that is what you meant?), put it on some sand in a bowl, light the charcoal, and let it heat up until red. Then put the resin on. The resin will melt and send off smoke.

Note: do not use barbecue charcoal...it gives off dangerous fumes. Only use charcoal meant for burning resins.

Make sure the sand is two to three inches deep.

~ C

Graymalkin
09-02-2011, 14:06
well, that's the charcoal i got, specifically for incense, but I'll do just that.

Nevada
09-02-2011, 14:41
Even the charcoal discs made for incense shouldn't really be used indoors, IMO. They give off a LOT of smoke when burning the incense, in my experience. They're also quite hot when burning (smoldering) and of course need to be in a fire safe container, as does stick incense. They stay hot for so long, they're really overkill for most needs I've ever had.

I prefer stick incense if I use it indoors. I think it's much easier to control - and to extinguish in a hurry if needed.

(With a curious cat around I even avoid candles and stick incense.)

The crowned one
09-02-2011, 14:47
I love the charcoal pads, but you must let them get to white before you add anything you wish to burn....and they burn whatever you put on then very fast and furiously. I can fill a room with wonderful aromatic smoke in about 3 minutes :)

I light 3 edges of the pad I hold the match there untill I see red glow on one sde, then light the other sides..

Caedryn
10-02-2011, 11:43
Even the charcoal discs made for incense shouldn't really be used indoors, IMO. They give off a LOT of smoke when burning the incense, in my experience. They're also quite hot when burning (smoldering) and of course need to be in a fire safe container, as does stick incense. They stay hot for so long, they're really overkill for most needs I've ever had.

I prefer stick incense if I use it indoors. I think it's much easier to control - and to extinguish in a hurry if needed.

(With a curious cat around I even avoid candles and stick incense.)

They shouldn't. I have lit them, there is a bit of smoke and a little bit of sparking, but no great amount of smoke. Once they are fully fired up and glowing red, there is no smoke at all.

But, if it concerns anyone, take enough Frankincense and dissolve it in a carrier oil such as olive oil, almond oil, or safflower oil. Put this oil onto one of the aromatic oil burners...you know, the one that looks like a dish on a short column, put a tea light in the column underneath the bowl with the oil. Light candle and after about five minutes, you will have the fragrance of the frankincense oil permeating your house.

Put it where the cat is unable to reach it.

~ C

Graymalkin
10-02-2011, 11:45
Olive oil? wont it smell of olives if I burned it then?

Caedryn
10-02-2011, 11:48
Olive oil? wont it smell of olives if I burned it then?

Not really, the frankincense takes over. But even if it did, olives smell nice.

Or, go to a store that carries aromatic oils and use that.

~ C

Graymalkin
10-02-2011, 11:50
i'll try the Olive oil, thanks!

Caedryn
10-02-2011, 11:57
i'll try the Olive oil, thanks!

You are welcome!

~ C

photokat
10-02-2011, 12:21
I personally love the charcoal.

I light one and put it in a shell or fire safe dish, on top of another dish (or on a bowl with sand), so it doesn't touch the ground (table etc).

When buying Frankincense, get some good stuff.
It's well worth it!

I highly recommend Oman Hougari:
http://www.somaluna.com/prod/oman_frankincense.asp?m=19

Oman Fusoos is awesome, too:
http://www.somaluna.com/product.asp?p=2596&m=19

You can always add Dragon's Blood (http://www.somaluna.com/prod/dragons_blood.asp?m=19), it acts as a booster for fragrances.

Good Frankincense is heavenly! Enjoy.

Graymalkin
10-02-2011, 12:58
I -think- I got the hang of it... despite the smoke in the air and the smell of burning resin (I now have it right next to an open window) I am detecting a whiff of that scent that I love... I will post updates.

brightcrazystar
10-02-2011, 14:34
Take 3 parts frankincense, 2 parts myrrh, 1 part storax or sandalwood.

put in mortar and grind all three together with pestle. sprinkle over hot censor coals or soak in carrier oil (4 parts cold pressed high grade) olive oil. soak in the dark for 30 days to masticate the oil and strain with microfine coffee filter.

the reason you are getting resin smell is because you do not have enough of the surface of your incense exposed to the coal. grind it for better effect.

thinbuddha
10-02-2011, 17:06
I use charcoal incense. I don't place the resin on the charcoal- I place it next to the charcoal. You can get the incense odor without much smoke at all.

Caedryn
11-02-2011, 00:37
i'll try the Olive oil, thanks!

PS - when using an oil burner, depending on the type, put a heat protector underneath it so it protects whateve surface it is on, because the column holding the dish can get very hot.

~ C

Caedryn
11-02-2011, 00:43
I -think- I got the hang of it... despite the smoke in the air and the smell of burning resin (I now have it right next to an open window) I am detecting a whiff of that scent that I love... I will post updates.

Resin odour? The resin heats up, it emits smoke which carries the scent.

~ C

Graymalkin
11-02-2011, 11:31
well, a burning something... but I think it may take a few tries to get right.

Caedryn
11-02-2011, 11:55
This rather puzzles me. All that has to be done is to light the charcoal, wait till it is red hot with white ash over it, put a piece of resin on it, resin melts smoke rises like 10 incense sticks, and viola - fragrance.

I am starting to wonder if you have a. good resin, b. good charcoal.

~ C

Graymalkin
11-02-2011, 12:00
I normally get the incense sticks. I only got these the other day to try them out.

brightcrazystar
11-02-2011, 12:56
Burning is a chemical change, and this not always suitable. Dragon's blood for example doesn't bond well to water, makes a almost scentless oil, and actually releases mercury when burnt. Thus, it was perfumed into the air by the ancestors of the Art.

I also could advise get some 100 proof vodka, pure distilled water, essential oil, and a perfume bottle. Make a perfume of your scent, and just mist the air. It smells wonderful and there is far less cleanup. The oils can be expensive, and getting the portions right is key. All the reason to start learning how to extract your own which you can learn easily and save bundles. The only method for this is practice but there are good guides to help you.

I long ago started using perfume as a way to add scent to rituals, or to even consecrate and purify a cloth or piece of clothing to a purpose, a paper of even a deck of tarot cards. Jasmine and Rose are quite nice, and tend to make the connection to the surreal lower astral that makes readings more lucid.

I also find I can mix wet and dry on the odiferious ether ( a fancy word for a plane of spiritual Earth, which is the coalescense of all the other elements.) This really equilibrates scent well, and the notes on the censor or the notes on the perfume can easily be blended. Cinnamon (Fire) and Chrysthanemum (Earth) burning with the dryness with Eucalyptus (Air) and Lotus (Water) is a awesome combination, for example.

(my lady loves that her man can make perfume AND dinner, lol... but for me cooking and perfume are just extensions of my Alchemical efforts.)


If you must burn jook sticks, you get alot more bang for your burn if you make your own, and you will save tons of money in the long run. I make my own incense cones and it is quite easy. Cones are REALLY easy and highly customizable.

Then again, I love to make everything myself if I can. I dream of a lab in my house, where I can finally expand from vegetable alchemy to mineral alchemy...

Graymalkin
11-02-2011, 13:13
Burning is a chemical change, and this not always suitable. Dragon's blood for example doesn't bond well to water, makes a almost scentless oil, and actually releases mercury when burnt. Thus, it was perfumed into the air by the ancestors of the Art.

I also could advise get some 100 proof vodka, pure distilled water, essential oil, and a perfume bottle. Make a perfume of your scent, and just mist the air. It smells wonderful and there is far less cleanup. The oils can be expensive, and getting the portions right is key. All the reason to start learning how to extract your own which you can learn easily and save bundles. The only method for this is practice but there are good guides to help you.

I long ago started using perfume as a way to add scent to rituals, or to even consecrate and purify a cloth or piece of clothing to a purpose, a paper of even a deck of tarot cards. Jasmine and Rose are quite nice, and tend to make the connection to the surreal lower astral that makes readings more lucid.

I also find I can mix wet and dry on the odiferious ether ( a fancy word for a plane of spiritual Earth, which is the coalescense of all the other elements.) This really equilibrates scent well, and the notes on the censor or the notes on the perfume can easily be blended. Cinnamon (Fire) and Chrysthanemum (Earth) burning with the dryness with Eucalyptus (Air) and Lotus (Water) is a awesome combination, for example.

(my lady loves that her man can make perfume AND dinner, lol... but for me cooking and perfume are just extensions of my Alchemical efforts.)


If you must burn jook sticks, you get alot more bang for your burn if you make your own, and you will save tons of money in the long run. I make my own incense cones and it is quite easy. Cones are REALLY easy and highly customizable.

Then again, I love to make everything myself if I can. I dream of a lab in my house, where I can finally expand from vegetable alchemy to mineral alchemy...

What are good books that discusses how to make good oil? Is it like an actual cookbook? "ground frankincense resign and mix two teaspoons with 1 cup of alcohol... preheat cauldron to 350 degrees...." or something of that natural?

Graymalkin
11-02-2011, 13:36
Take 3 parts frankincense, 2 parts myrrh, 1 part storax or sandalwood.

put in mortar and grind all three together with pestle. sprinkle over hot censor coals or soak in carrier oil (4 parts cold pressed high grade) olive oil. soak in the dark for 30 days to masticate the oil and strain with microfine coffee filter.


what do you mean by parts? teaspoons, tablespoons? cups?

brightcrazystar
11-02-2011, 14:51
This is a ratio based on how much you plan to use: It is about proportion to yield, where yield is the amount you want.

So consider this a fraction esentially:

The whole is 6/6, or "six sixths".

3/6 is frankincense
2/6 is myrhh
1/6 is storax or sandalwood

This is to make dry incense, and you get the resin, and a mortar and pestle and pound it down to a powder. pound them together, and you will get a scent for the end product.

OR

To this, you can add another 4 parts pure extra virgin cold pressed olive oil (I suggest sicilian as it is very nice), making this mixture 10/6.

This, after 30 days will yield about 6/6 pure purfume oil. the other 4/6th will be the actual resins you use, and this can be used but the scent will be muted by the mastication of the resins in the oil. Mastication means the breakdown, like when your saliva breaks down your food. It takes about 30 days for the breakdown to make the oil purfumes, but it is quite pleasant especially when in a burner, as was mentioned before.

As for what a part is, you can decide, by weight or by volume. I tend to go by weight or by volume for different effects. By measure is a good way to go until you get more control, and everyone has a measuring cup. by weight takes a little more work, and a good scale. So here is this recipe, a "six sixths" our desired yield is a half cup:

1/4 cup frankincense
1/6 cup myrhh
1/12 cup storax

Now, here is the math for so far:

3/12 cup frankencense, 2/12 cup myrrh, 1/12 cup storax.

mil these with a mortar and pestle until fine and blended (you can work with parts of it and blend it all in a larger bowl, I do this with large amounts.)


For perfume oil,
Add 8/12 cup olive oil of superior quality for a total of 14/12 cups, or 1 and 1/6 cups. Let set in cool dark sealed container for 30 days or so (I time this to the cycle of the moon, specifically the cycle of my lady, which is traditional for elizabethan occultism. before that, I did so by the actual moon cycle). After wait is done, strain through an ultra fine coffee filter.

This also yields a good half cup of oil, plus the resin is still there. that can burn, but will not be as strong. this is yet another reason cold-pressed is best. I like to include this resin and oil goo in candles.


As for references, I am afraid I am the only reference I need. I learned all this from my family and experimenting, not books. We are part of the "conjure tradition" out of Lousiana, which includes very little voodoo but alot of the French and Elizabethan grimoire traditions and heresay and alot of augury, a good bit of feeling things out, and a great deal of kitchen and garden alchemy, as I like to call it. I pursue it much more than most of them do, besides my great grandmother on my mother's side, and my grandfather on my father's, who was a Qabalist, Mason, and Pastor of a Baptist church I held my first seance at and studied Tarot in during services. My mom is the best gardener I have ever met, though.

The recipe I gave you for "Three Magi Conjure dust" above is what we burned in church sometimes and what is mixed with ashes before we spread the deceased remains. It is generally for high holy days. It is similar but not the same as Catholic incense, I am told. Not being roman catholic, I don't care for the papal faith tendencies. We also threw in copper dust and tossed in fires. it makes them greenish and awesome scent.

As for the three magi, this is why:
"Frankincense is for the spirits. They love it. - Evokes Clarity
Myrrh is for your spirit, so you can bear their presence - Invokes Purity
Storax is to make sure everyone there plays nice." - Banishes Negativity.

I never had a "lying spirit" that stayed in the fumes of storax. EVER.

To be honest, I come from a family that does lapidary work, brick masonry, woodwork, gardening, herbalism and augury, hunting, fishing, and studies foreign languages as well as our own roots which we have pretty good records of. We never had money, but always had land and treasures we made with our own hands. When I want to do something that they haven't covered yet, I just dive it and experiment until I figure it out. I am not one for reading much of a person I don't know. I prefer to work getting my hands dirty. I read after I am at least a bit experienced and I have some good questions, and then I can tell what is a good book. But as for this, I have read no books on the subject. Never needed to. And there was never a reason to keep a secret about it, cause we'd shoot people who came on our land, lol!

Caedryn
12-02-2011, 02:52
Informative post Brightcrazy star.

I process my oil differently.

Regarding mercury though, Daemonodrops draco or Dracaena draco does not contain mercury, so it is safe to burn. However, D. Cinnabari is a different story and is poisonous due to mercury, and should not be used. Modern dragon's blood is however more likely to be from the Daemonorops rattan palms.

~ C

brightcrazystar
12-02-2011, 03:57
Thank's for clarifying something not everyone may know, Caedryn! I forget to fill in blanks sometimes.

Cinnibar is fine, you just need to sweat out the mercury this can be done on an outside grill in a cast iron skillet with grilling surface (grooves for the grill marks). the mercury will collect in the bottom. The result is the "pure sulfur" spoken about as the best of subfumigants for dispelling and tormenting evil spirits. I also used a broiler pan and over for this, but was not home, and left all the windows open when I had a big kitchen.

As for herbal and mineral dragon's blood, you combine both, with the cinnibar unsweated for ink for talismans. We use the mineral to purify the intents of the herb, as it is a herb of desire used in money and love magick.

Play safe, and wear gloves, safety equipment, clothes you don't care about, and never mix minerals and herbs with the same mortar and pestle. Oh, and keep a fire extinguisher handy! Was that enough common sense/safety disclaimer, or do I need more?

I was working to make sulfuric acid from scratch with my cousin when I was a kid, so I have no fear of chemistry. We use it to wash brick for apprentice masonry (actually brick masonry), so I may forget to tell people to watch for their own safety, my bad.

How do you make your oil, Caedryn?

Caedryn
12-02-2011, 06:16
Dragons blood resin I use for strength/protection.

I have only use cinnabar I got in Chinatown to bring things to life. I do not like using mercury on the whole. But, give me dragons blood, frankincense, myrrh resins and I am off to town.

My method does not differ a lot from yours brightcrazystar. Mainly I just add the resin and heat it up a bit in the oven to speed up the process a little, and I use some different ingredients and amounts.

In the case of dragons blood, as the oil does not release its fragrance, I also make a tincture of it to use for various things. I also add the tincture to the oil, with a few drops of pure dish soap to act as an emulsifier, so there is fragrance to the oil.

As a child, I really into chemistry as well. I made a high grade gunpowder, and hydrogen to let loose balloons all over the place lol. Pretty simple stuff really, but fun.

~ C

Briar Rose
04-03-2011, 13:02
The shop here sells only one brand of charcoal. It's those round bricks. I use the long handled lighter. I get orange line with sparks through it, when lighting. Then I put the loose resin incense on top, and it only burns for 5 minutes and goes out. I tried buying new bricks and I get the same thing. The edge of the bricks get gray ash, but the rest is still black.

I have a burner that was made for this. I don't know what I am doing wrong.

avalonian
04-03-2011, 19:25
The shop here sells only one brand of charcoal. It's those round bricks. I use the long handled lighter. I get orange line with sparks through it, when lighting. Then I put the loose resin incense on top, and it only burns for 5 minutes and goes out. I tried buying new bricks and I get the same thing. The edge of the bricks get gray ash, but the rest is still black.

I have a burner that was made for this. I don't know what I am doing wrong.

I think you may be putting the incense on too soon. I usually wait until the whole brick is grey before putting anything on it, sometimes I blow gently on it to help it along (as I'm not exactly patient). The burner I now use is cauldron shaped and the bricks do seem to burn better than on the flat one I had before.

:) :) :)

Briar Rose
05-03-2011, 14:59
The charcoal never gets grey. It gets hot orange lines through it. The only gray I ever see it a tiny bit on a little edge. It just goes out.

avalonian
05-03-2011, 16:45
The charcoal never gets grey. It gets hot orange lines through it. The only gray I ever see it a tiny bit on a little edge. It just goes out.

When you get that first grey bit try blowing really gently on it a few times, you'll see a red glow start to build up each time you blow, do that a few times till it gets going. It's a bit like those survival expert chaps do on the television when they are starting a fire. I also light it in more than one place, sometimes they are a bit obstinate!

:) :) :)

prudence
06-03-2011, 11:56
What are good books that discusses how to make good oil? Is it like an actual cookbook? "ground frankincense resign and mix two teaspoons with 1 cup of alcohol... preheat cauldron to 350 degrees...." or something of that natural?
Hi,

check out this website, the owner of the site has a few freebies that I have found quite helpful, especially a PDF of recipes for oils/salves and such. (called The Ultimate Potion Book)

http://home.earthlink.net/~extrascentsory/id1.html

He will email the PDF to you when you request it.

Also, Hoodoo Herb and Root Magic by Catherine Yronwode is a great resource for making your own oils or anything else involving herbs and roots. She has spent decades researching hoodoo and has amassed a lot of good, solid information on the subject, she is held in very high regard in the conjure community. I consider her book invaluable in my practice.

http://www.amazon.com/Hoodoo-Herb-Root-Magic-African-American/dp/0971961204/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1299376370&sr=8-1