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Ankou
03-05-2006, 02:32
Just thought I'd start a thread for all those spring herb gardners, to brag or lament as appropriate :)

My herbs are still very small and not really getting on so well. I think the soil mix is wrong and am going to try adjusting the mix and transplanting soon.
The only thing loving life is a pot of chives I saved from the trash man last year. They are growing like wild fire! Don't really use a lot of chives, but must find a way to have at them soon.

Cheers

redflash
03-05-2006, 03:17
We have been at this house for 4 years & all we have ever done is cut the grass, not had time to do anything. But yesterday I started some seeds off, dwarf lavendar, basil & thyme, & I was so excited about my first real attempt at growing something that I took a picture ! So now they are on my bedroom windowsill, will be getting some more seeds at the weekend, I want a good selection in my first ever herb garden. If they grow well enough once theyre in the garden I want to use them for herbal pillows, spells etc.

Ankou
03-05-2006, 03:34
One of the things I started doing last year was collecting seeds from the groceries. Particularly if I found a really good organic tomato or pepper.

They are sprouting nicely right now. Peppers in particular are easy to get going from grocery seeds. At our old house, all our peppers the second year were from groceries :)

Happy planting!

midnightmerry
03-05-2006, 06:09
One of the things I started doing last year was collecting seeds from the groceries. Particularly if I found a really good organic tomato or pepper.

They are sprouting nicely right now. Peppers in particular are easy to get going from grocery seeds. At our old house, all our peppers the second year were from groceries :)

Happy planting!

That's a great idea! Do you just pop the seeds into cups or right into the ground straight from the veggie?

catti
03-05-2006, 06:35
This year ( my second spring at the house in GA) I have modest plans.
The nasturtiums we put into pots and they have sprouted this week. A bit late here, because I dont think they like the heat/humidity but lucky there was a cold snap and the nights are going into the 50's.

My neighbor gave me parsley and cucumber in peat pots and I have to find a place for them. The parsley I will pot but the cucumber I want to give it lots of room . I am going to make a mound in the center of a clear spot that gets good sun and then put an old fencing around it. Cucumbers are great ( i grew them when i lived in Georgia before ) and I have high hopes.

I bought some foxglove ( digitalis) and put them next to the hosta and iris in a part shady section. This year they are a bit in shock and I think the flower buds may not fully open, but next year I hope to post some good pics.

And today, after work if we finish the school project in time, I hope to have us planting some sweet peas. If I get any vegetables from them that will just be a plus....I am planting them for the flowers :)

Catti

Ankou
03-05-2006, 06:41
Scavenged seeds, I let them dry out in a bowl for a day or two, then put them in a brown paper bag in the closet till I'm ready to plant them.

I'm trying my first scavenged basil seeds this year too, so far only one of them has got any gumption in it. Poor mighty little fellow...

Ankou
03-05-2006, 06:42
Cucumbers!!! I've been meening to try them again, and I want to learn how to pickle too... hmmmm Thanks for the reminder, Catti :D

catti
04-05-2006, 01:03
Two others i want to plant is echinacea and tobacco. Both are beautiful flowers, the echinacea is a perenial and does very well in the South USA and it would be neat to have your own tobacco....although I have no idea about harvesting and curing.

Go for the cucumbers Ankou ! ....I have found them to be very forgiving plants. And it is so much fun to pick a cucumber wash it and eat it. I learned a trick. You cut the end and then take the two peices and rub in a circular motion, this white stuff forms and you wash it out. That takes the bitter out of your cucumber. I have no idea why it works..

sharpchick
04-05-2006, 08:00
Just thought I'd start a thread for all those spring herb gardners, to brag or lament as appropriate :)

My herbs are still very small and not really getting on so well. I think the soil mix is wrong and am going to try adjusting the mix and transplanting soon.
The only thing loving life is a pot of chives I saved from the trash man last year. They are growing like wild fire! Don't really use a lot of chives, but must find a way to have at them soon.

Cheers

Just don't make your soil mix too rich, Ankou. Herbs really prefer lean soil, and some of the Mediterranean herbs actually prefer even rocky soil.

If you have had a somewhat cool and wet spring, they may sulk a little, but as soon as the summer sun hits their little tops, they'll take off.

sharpchick
04-05-2006, 08:02
Go for the cucumbers Ankou ! ....I have found them to be very forgiving plants. And it is so much fun to pick a cucumber wash it and eat it. I learned a trick. You cut the end and then take the two peices and rub in a circular motion, this white stuff forms and you wash it out. That takes the bitter out of your cucumber. I have no idea why it works..

My grandma called that soaping the cucumber. The thing was, my airhead cousin took her literally and actually applied a bar of soap to one. . . her family was not favorably impressed with the salad that night. . .

Sophie
04-05-2006, 21:20
Well - half the rosemary survived winter on my windblown terrace, and half did not. Ditto with the (under-the-soil) mint - that one I will have to boost. The bay is doing well. I've not yet attempted to plant basil yet - in a week-10 days I think. The thyme died :( - I think it couldn't stand the cold winds - so I will have to replant some. The sage didn't do too well, but that is my fault, it was in a pot that was soaking - I will replant that too. The lavendar is doing very well and the heather is flowering... :)

I use herbs mainly for cooking, to make sweet-smelling things like lavender bags and to look pretty (that's the case of the heather - my little corner of wildness on the 9th floor). I also like the heady smell of herbs when I step outside...

I'm going to a garden centre this week-end to see what other herbs I might plant. The smellier the better, but I need some hardy ones!

Tarotwytch
06-05-2006, 04:46
Yes, I agree with sharpchick about the Mediterranean herbs in particular. These type of herbs relish a dryish soil and lots of sun - think about where the herbs originate from and try to reproduce those conditions. They don't like to have their feet cold and wet. Also take note of which ones are annual (only last one season and then die down) such as basil, parsley and which ones are perennial (carry on from year to year) such as rosemary, lavender, sage etc. Also some will be herbaceous perennials which die down in the winter but reappear in the Spring eg chives.
Hope this helps a bit.

wizzle
06-05-2006, 12:21
Before I leave my house here in So Cal, I'll try to post pics.

I've had vast luck with the flower seeds I've purchased from

http://www.flowersoul.com/

They are soooo cheap you can just cast them about. The nasturtiams I started 2 years ago are still going stong, too strong. I love the allysum seeds to filll in here and there. I don't know if they sell internationally and I've whined about my need for bulk herb seeds. This is a very nice lady, btw. And the amount of seed you get for the price is truly amazing if you are only used to those itty bitty packets put up by the major companies.

ciao and happy gardening

redflash
06-05-2006, 16:09
I'm going to try my hand at roses, not sure how I will get on but I would love to be able to collect my own petals & buds for spells instead of buying them.

sharpchick
06-05-2006, 22:48
I'm going to try my hand at roses, not sure how I will get on but I would love to be able to collect my own petals & buds for spells instead of buying them.

Oh, redflash, I love roses, but only the old ones, like my grandmother used to grow. Twenty years ago, I tried my hand at hybrid teas. I am a concientious gardner, but I couldn't garden by a calendar (for spraying with fungicides and regular feeding with a systemic product). They were very high maintenace, and in the winter time, frankly, they look like sticks.

I prefer particularly old climbers, and you can find many that are willing to be confined. I've used 1/2 whiskey barrels, and tied the canes, and had wonderful results, as long as I don't let them get more than about 8-9 feet tall. A lot of old roses have a very heady scent, also and many only bloom once or twice during the season. . . smaller blooms and different from the typical visual image one gets when thinking about roses. If you plant for sequence of bloomtime, though, you can have something in bloom all during your warm season.

redflash
07-05-2006, 03:28
I have one rosebush in my garden that was here when I bought the house 4 years ago, I have wood decking outside my conservatory & it just grew from underneath that. It has enormous blood red blooms but for the rest of the year it does look pretty awful ! I really want to get my garden looking good, I want somewhere I can get away from the rest of the world ! I never have much time to do it, what with bringing my little boy up ( he's 3 later this year ), working, keeping the house running, studying tarot / witchcraft / herbs etc etc. There aren't enough hours in the day for me ! But hopefully later this year I will have some nice pictures to put on this thread. xx

Ankou
09-05-2006, 03:04
We moved into a house with two rose plants already planted. One is a classic red rose, and the other is a gorgeous wild rose. I want to make a trellis for the wild creeper. Nothing elaborate, just something to show her off.

My transplants seem to be doing ok so far, but its only a few days in. I'll post picks as they get a little more photogenic :D

cheers

catti
07-06-2006, 02:36
i was dreaming about gardening last night~

I was trying to plant oregano by this tree (!) and it was all swampy (!) and then as i was digging the whole i found a human skull (!!!)

i think i am feeling guilty about my poor oregano, tomato and pepper that are languishing outside in pots waiting to be planted.

Meanwhile, the rose of sharon bushes may yet make it.
The hydrangeas transplanted beautifully.

How about you?

redflash
07-06-2006, 03:55
I haven't made much progress on my garden, but the weather has turned lovely so at last I am on with it. I'm about to build a herb rockery & I have decided to put a discreet altar in it aswell. I can't have anything too elaborate as my garden is overlooked by my neighbours, but I want something there as I have nowhere in the house for an altar. I have had trouble with the dwarf lavendar I have been growing from seed, only a few of them have come through. When I get my rockery done I will post a piccie. I have never done gardening before so I'm sort of winging it !

Sherringham
07-06-2006, 08:49
I have honeysuckle at the end of my garden on one side and up near the house on the other, being evergreen its nice for all year and the most glorious perfume in the evenings when its flowering (now!!) Could grow together with rambling roses.

I also grow peppers and tomatoes , the tiny ones in baskets, but they need lots of water and a tomato feed too

sharpchick
07-06-2006, 09:00
Here are some pics of my garden last month. . .My garden altar is just around the bend to the left of the path and it's not very small. . . ;)

redflash
07-06-2006, 15:56
That's gorgeous sharpchick ! It looks so peaceful. I hope I can get my garden looking good.

I wish I could have a good size altar in the garden, I haven't got room for one in my house. But there's no privacy anywhere in my garden so it will have to be hidden in the soon-to-be made herb garden. If I ever leave this horrible place I hope I get somewhere with a very private garden so I can have an altar that I don't have to hide. xx

Le vert
08-06-2006, 16:24
everyone's looks so nice:)

here is mine.my veranda:) but I cannot photo all of my herbs...actually too many to do..

mainly,mints,camomiles,wild strawberry,rosemary,geranium,basil and so on...:)

catlin
08-06-2006, 18:14
If I ever leave this horrible place I hope I get somewhere with a very private garden so I can have an altar that I don't have to hide. xx

Oh, you can also make an altar that does not look like an altar at first sight. You can take eg a slab of stone and decorate that, eg with a triskele or triquetta or whatever symbol. You can use plants that are dedicated to your God/dess, you can make a nice arrangement with some stones, pebbles, feathers, whatever.

Sophie
08-06-2006, 21:48
Good idea, catlin. I'll borrow it for myself :). I don't have an altar-shaped table, I have a small round table I can use. I like round tables, they fit my philosophy of life ;). I'll see what I can organise by way of an altar. Mind you, I don't feel the need to disguise it - I would just like everyone to feel comfortable around it, if it's going to be in a place that is not all my own (i.e. the terrace!).

On a less happy note, one of my basil pots has failed :(. One is thriving, the other not - go figure. I will replant some more basil, see if it takes. I wonder if it's something in the pot? My daisy pot is not very happy either. The rest of the flowers are doing fine, including the roses - but not the daisy. I wish I knew why. It's not been too hot, or too cold. Maybe too windy? Do daisies dislike the wind?

For the last lot of herbs I planted, including the second basil pot, I did a little dedication ceremony, very simple. I planted them early in the morning, and my terrace faces East - South-East. The pots are all thriving. I hadn't done that for the basil that failed - or for the daisy for that matter. Might it have made a difference? I always plant with love and intent, surely that counts too?

Anyway, I'll try and take a few pictures and post them later.

catlin
08-06-2006, 22:06
Good idea, catlin. I'll borrow it for myself :). I don't have an altar-shaped table, I have a small round table I can use. I like round tables, they fit my philosophy of life ;)

Guess what? My altar table in the reading room is in fact a round bistro table, one of those with a cast iron foot and a round marble table top. You can use any table you like, no rules ;)

sharpchick
09-06-2006, 00:14
My garden altar is very simple - a gravelled rectangle about 8 feet by 6 feet with candlestands made of wood and topped with a ceramic tile for the quarter candles (made for me by a Christian friend who thought the idea of a garden altar was so cool, he wanted to contribute), and my altar in the middle. My altar has a 30 inch tall column I bought from a garden supply store, topped with a 24 inch square granite tile similar to those used for paving patios. The altar is located just to the left of the gravel path in the pic, and unfortunately was obscured by the mulberry tree beside it. My little pond is to the right (south) of the altar and the sound of the water gently burbling adds something to outdoor rituals for me.

When I get pics, I'll post.

Le vert
09-06-2006, 19:25
my veranda is usually sun-flooded but in these days,here the weather is very windy and ticklish.

sometimes very hot.and today is chilly.

after the a storm-force wind..only camomiles are burning out.some of them went off..
aside from them.others..especially mints are sooo powerful.wildstrawberries as well..

I'm considering I need to re-plant new ones..- camomiles

Le vert
10-06-2006, 22:27
This heart shaped one has been made recently.
...with succulent plants.

I'm not working in these days.
...just creating some to make me confortable.

here is cloudy with occasional showers of rain..was not so nice to have far to go...

sharpchick
11-06-2006, 01:58
How cool, Le Vert. It looks like you are very creative with containers. I do quite a bit of container gardening, too, but I am not nearly as good with the combinations of plants in one container.

Le vert
11-06-2006, 10:07
How cool, Le Vert. It looks like you are very creative with containers. I do quite a bit of container gardening, too, but I am not nearly as good with the combinations of plants in one container.

Thanks:)I'm just trying.learning by mistake:D

succulent plants don't need much waters and they prefer sunny corner:)
Though here in Japan,it is coming a rainy season named 'tsuyu'...(Anyway it doesn't rain all the time in the period, and SOMETIMES the weather is nice.)but I am hoping it'll end soon.

ravenest
12-06-2006, 17:44
Hi guys, I'm new to this section (havent had time to check them all yet). What a great thread, and the pics too!

I live on the central east coast of Australia, which is subtropical. In a fairly narrow but steep valley, borded to the north by a steep escarpment and waterfalls, rainforest and World Heritage rainforest areas. The mountains here are close to the coast and form a boundary for many north / south species of plants and animals, hence both can thrive.

Our property (its a community) grows various citrus, avacado, bananas, macadamia, bunya and pecan nuts, numerous native food trees and various gardens (we also make tofu and tempeh).

My own little garden has a permanent and a changing section. The permanent section is the cabin surrounds which is a gnarly and twisted grove of Turpintine trees and bloodwoods. Further out are various species of bamboo, native plants, orchids, bromilliads (Ive become a bit of a bromilliad breeder) and lots of other stuff. [Including a few pet pine trees cause I luv em]

The other part is the vegie and herb section and that changes from time to time, now winter I have broccolli, med. parsley, peas, corriander galore, various Thai herbs (Im a cook) lettuce, tomatoe, yarrow. Its an interesting experiemnt as its winter and I am not sure how they will handle it.

Here are some hints I have found helpfull latley, especially in the cold weather.
To boost seedlings, water them early with warm water, better still use soda water, and better warm soda (it has dissolved CO2 in it, thats what plants breath.) if you have access to it put a few drops of colloidal silver in water.

I love making my own compost! but this threads getting a little long.

I want to make a circle garden with different crystals for different sections that focus the moonlight on the garden through the crystal and observe the results.

Its all so wonderfully alchemical!

You can get some pics of the environment at www.bellingen.com/homeland

and plants at www.bellingen.com/homeland/Flora.html

Sherringham
12-06-2006, 18:20
Wow that was fascinating Ravenest. Thanks for the link

catti
25-06-2006, 08:27
Ravennest~I have never heard of using soda water for seedlings...I am very bad with most seeds, I only seem to be able to handle nasturstiums, and they dont do very well in the climate i live in ( too hot and too humid).

My next go with seeds will be hollyhocks, I have seen some beautiful examples in neighborhoods around me and understand that if i plant in the autumn they will bloom in the summer. So I am going to try and prepare a spot and then put them in. With any luck they will look like this :) http://vtgcrec.ifas.ufl.edu/pages/HOLLIS%20GARDENS/Hollis-3-19-03/Library-hollyhock.JPG

Catti

ravenest
25-06-2006, 14:03
I dont see why you should be bad with seeds. Maybe the seeds are not good quality? They have an inbuilt programme and if you give them the basic requirements, they should germinate.

In which way are you bad? How many seeds to you set out for how many plants? When, where and in what (medium) do you raise them? Do you kick start them at the right moon time? Do you soak them in water 24hrs, before hand. It could be a simple adjustment in one of these processes and then ... you will be very good with seeds :-)

Some Australian native seeds will not germinate until they have been fired!

Sherringham
25-06-2006, 18:25
Catti , Hollyhocks are beautiful, I bought some seeds about 10 years ago at Hever Castle in Kent, (Anne Boleyn's home) and they really thrived for about 8 years, then they got rust, which is a hazard to hollyhocks. Enjoy yours!!

Shadow Wolf
13-07-2006, 07:56
I have an herb garden in pots in my front yard. I also have a birdbath, garden gnomes a fairy statue with windchimes, I try to keep the birdbath filled with clean water, but it doesn't always work out that way.

Anyway.....

My herbs are doing really well and growing really tall. Even my oregano is
sprouting really nicely. My thyme needs a little work, but other wise all is
well on this herb front !!!

Oh, I have Rosemary, Spearmint, French Lavender, Basil, Oregano, and Thyme.

Leleii
13-07-2006, 08:15
In my front yard, I have three lavender plants, they are getting leggy from
all the rain. In my side yard I have oregano, italian flat parsley,
basil, lemon balm, bee balm, peppermint, spearmint. They are doing good,
my parsley lasts all winter and seeds itself in the spring. I live in NJ.
I am also growing yellow grape tomatoes, plum tomatoes, beefsteak tomatoes,
argula, red lettuce, romaine lettuce, stringbeans, cucumbers, italian eggplant
and white eggplant, I have sunflowers in the front of the garden. I have
three blueberry bushes, they are only three years old, the birds ate all the
blueberries from the bush. They are doing well this year, since my husband
mulched them. I planted the sunflower from seeds and they are doing good.
I planted sweetpeas and they are not doing good. Oh Well.
Leleii

Leleii
13-07-2006, 08:24
I forget...My climbing roses that is totally wild and out of control but
blooms so beautifully. With all the rains that we are having had a short
bloom time this year. I was so disappointed. The roses has such a short
time to bloom and this year it was even shorter. I am thinking of planting
more roses on the east side of my house. I have two old rose bushes on that
side of the house. I want roses that has rosehips in the fall.
I love roses, they are my favorite. In May when I was food shopping, they had
peony bushes on sale. I love peonies and I bought one. I planted it this spring and it is doing well. I hope that next year it will have flowers on it. It is a red
peony bush. I have a large day lily plant that I saved. I bought it at Shoprite because I felt sorry for it. Now it is a huge bush, it is blooming now, in the fall I have to divide it or rather my husband had to divide it.
Leleii

Heckta
28-07-2006, 07:26
Hey, maybe someone can help since this topic is on gardens. I have a small apartment with low to medium light. I have no direct sunlight. So, I know I am limited on what I can grow. However, has anyone run into the problem- you would like to grow an indoor garden but, have limited space and low to medium light sun exposure . Any suggestions would help- thanks! :)

sharpchick
28-07-2006, 08:50
Get some full spectrum light bulbs that fit in standard lamps. If your lampshade can be tilted, you can leave the shade on, if not, remove it for 4-6 hours a day.

Heckta
28-07-2006, 10:01
Get some full spectrum light bulbs that fit in standard lamps. If your lampshade can be tilted, you can leave the shade on, if not, remove it for 4-6 hours a day.

Thumbs up on that sharpchick, I don't see any other way. I would love to have natural light but, I'll do what must be done.

sharpchick
29-07-2006, 00:55
I buy mine at Home Depot here. . . I suspect any home center store will have them.

They look weird, three tubes bent into a "U" in the bulb. I use them in my den where I have my parrots (they are also in the overhead fixture with the globe off) and many indoor plants.

Sophie
29-07-2006, 01:51
I'm harvesting coriander seeds at the moment, and had the first basil flowers appear - also good for seeds. I put the whole flower in a bottle of olive oil and let it macerate for a week or so - then use it. Delicious!

Sunflowers are out in full glory, turning this way and that, following the sun.

On the whole the roses are not suffering too much in the heat - at least the Bolshoi and the Poesie. The Eden climbers aren't too happy - but then they never were. I don't think they like my roof terrace and this year they've been decimated by flies, though I have sprayed them (with organic spray) religiously.

The lemon verbena is doing very well too! I shall soon be able to pick and dry it for tea, but for now, I enjoy the smell when I sit outside near it, and it keeps the mossies away. Good tangy taste in salads, too.

ravenest
29-07-2006, 10:13
I have a grove around my cabin and thats v. shadey, also verandah, I use low light plants, ferns love it, or any indoor variety (it depends on what you want to grow I suppose). If you have part access to light and your plants are in pots you can do a rotation. ie, keep some plants in the sun and some in low light then rotate every few days.

Heckta
29-07-2006, 12:17
I am thinking I will definitely use spectrum light bulbs and obtain plant stands that are about a foot wide that would fit between my couch and window sill. So I can get some natural light and use the spectrum light to make up for the lack of light. I found a site on gardener supplies online and I believe I can get most of everything I need there from stands to seeds. I do have a Home Depot near by so I will check them out as well for the spectrum light bulbs and stands. Basically, I will create my own indoor light garden. May be even a mini greenhouse. I am planning to grow Basil, Thyme, Oregano, Parsley, Rosemary, Sage, English Lavender, peppermint and possible more. I 've been researching several sites on growing herbs for the first time and looking into the old farmers almanac for more info. I have planets so I do have a green thumb but, I know herbs can be different. Thanks guys for your help .:)

ravenest
01-08-2006, 09:30
I've started harvesting sugar-snap and snow peas... yum! Cut my broccoli heads off and ate them, more grew back, ate them too, now even more growing.

Heckta
08-08-2006, 01:59
Wow! I just planted my herbs last week Thursday and I am already seeing signs of growth. Specifically, Thyme and Rosemary. I think I am seeing some signs of my Lavendar sprouting as well. I am so excited! :)

sharpchick
08-08-2006, 03:44
This spring, I got hold of the first prostrate rosemary I've ever planted. I love the form of the plant, and it seems to really love its location.

redflash
08-08-2006, 03:50
My garden is coming along very slowly ! Never have a lot of spare time but it's a start ! Got thyme, basil, curly parsley (which looks like a weed ! ), mint ( which looks like a nettle ! ) & some other herbs that I have forgotten the name of, begonias, lobelias,peony,verbena, honeysuckle, busy lizzies, pansies, asters etc. Started growing my own lavender from seed early this year, I planted a big tray but only 2 plants came through. Bit disappointed with them. Got a buddlia for the butterflies & my 2 black elder bushes are growing quicker than anything I have ever seen! My partner thinks they look like weeds but I love them.

When I bought the peony from the garden centre, there was this weird little plant in the pot with it. Think it might be some sort of cactus. So I will leave it alone & see what comes of it.

Having major trouble getting rid of the hedge bindweed. It looks so beautiful, with its white trumpet flowers. Can't believe something that pretty can do the damage it does !

Milfoil
08-08-2006, 06:20
My Rowan tree is crisping around the edges but then so are many of the trees around here because of the hot, dry weather.

Something is eating away at my Bay tree too - any ideas?

The herbs are all ok but the holly tree is also not at its best - I wonder why its the trees that are suffering this year?

sharpchick
08-08-2006, 07:07
My Rowan tree is crisping around the edges but then so are many of the trees around here because of the hot, dry weather.

Something is eating away at my Bay tree too - any ideas?

The herbs are all ok but the holly tree is also not at its best - I wonder why its the trees that are suffering this year?

I don't know if the UK is getting the same drought as the SE US this year, but I know the limited rain we have gotten has been scattered showers and certainly not enough to give the deep soaking needed by tree roots.

ravenest
08-08-2006, 13:21
It's that time of year and my 'stinky tree' is blooming again! EEYEEEW! What a pong! Dont know what it is, a large cone shaped tree, with beatifull clusters of white small flowers all over it like a giant white cone. the fruit from these is like a very hard tiny nashi pear (unedible). Boy does this thing stink! A very close, thick, clotted disgusting smell, like ... well, I,m not game to say (cause everybody will say 'How do you know what THAT smells like?'). Even when there is no breeze the smell flows down hill to the garden. people think I exagerate but I send them up the back yard to smell it and some dont even make it to the tree and are driven back before they get there (I love watching the expression on their faces when it hits them!). I know some plants stink like rotting things to attract flies but this tree is swarming with bees.

Any idea what this tree is?

Milfoil
09-08-2006, 04:51
I don't know if the UK is getting the same drought as the SE US this year, but I know the limited rain we have gotten has been scattered showers and certainly not enough to give the deep soaking needed by tree roots.

We certainly have had a very hot dry spell and the poor old trees and grass has suffered for it. Last few days though, we've had monsoon type weather so things are not too bad now.

The bay tree has some sort of bug attacking it - looks like a catapillar so I'd better see what I can do about that.

Milfoil
09-08-2006, 04:58
Any idea what this tree is?

Could be Ailanthus of some sort or a basswood.

ravenest
09-08-2006, 13:59
Do they have a bad smell?

sharpchick
11-08-2006, 10:37
It's that time of year and my 'stinky tree' is blooming again! EEYEEEW! What a pong! Dont know what it is, a large cone shaped tree, with beatifull clusters of white small flowers all over it like a giant white cone. the fruit from these is like a very hard tiny nashi pear (unedible). Boy does this thing stink! A very close, thick, clotted disgusting smell, like ... well, I,m not game to say (cause everybody will say 'How do you know what THAT smells like?'). Even when there is no breeze the smell flows down hill to the garden. people think I exagerate but I send them up the back yard to smell it and some dont even make it to the tree and are driven back before they get there (I love watching the expression on their faces when it hits them!). I know some plants stink like rotting things to attract flies but this tree is swarming with bees.

Any idea what this tree is?

Could it be a ginkgo? They have horribly smelly little fruits that break open on the ground and make you want to gag at the odor. Here's a pic of the leaves of the tree.

ravenest
11-08-2006, 14:03
Hmmm, dont think so, I remember them being different (the tree is in full flower and has no leaves ... yet. I checked the other photos and it appears closer to basswood (thanks for pics guys) but I dont think its that either.

maybe I could market the scent as a reverse perfume, to wear when you dont want to be annoyed by would be pick-upers?

Whish I had the tech to post a pic here of it?