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Major Tom
11-08-2006, 17:49
I attach a photo of an herb I've been unable to identify. It has a pungent smell and I've noticed my grape vines get a better fruit set when this herb is growing nearby. Anyone know what it is?

memries
11-08-2006, 19:39
Hi Major Tom.. it is very similar to a yellow Mimosa Plant. This is also called Acacia. Not sure though. Still it might give you a lead.

Red Emma
12-08-2006, 06:29
Hi Major Tom.. it is very similar to a yellow Mimosa Plant. This is also called Acacia. Not sure though. Still it might give you a lead.


When we lived in southern California, a very long time ago, there were Mimosa trees all over the place. Perhaps there are also Mimosa plants, although I never saw one at that time. I have the feeling that the blossoms of the trees were kind of sweet and pleasant, although, as I said, it was a very long time ago.

Blessings

sharpchick
12-08-2006, 07:26
Looks kind of like yarrow to me.

skygreen
12-08-2006, 07:49
This is Tansy a perennial herb The yellow, strong-scented, bitter-tasting flowers are in flat-topped clusters at the tops of the plant.
This plant can be an abortafacient in large doses There have been some deaths resulting from attempts at medicinal use .

Red Emma
12-08-2006, 08:26
This is Tansy a perennial herb The yellow, strong-scented, bitter-tasting flowers are in flat-topped clusters at the tops of the plant.
This plant can be an abortafacient in large doses There have been some deaths resulting from attempts at medicinal use .

That's why it looked so familiar to me. When we first moved to Oregon -- mid-sixties -- the state was awash with it. As you can imagine from Skygreen's posting, it didn't do cattle, or curious children, any good. At that time it became illegal to have it on your property. I haven't seen it for a very long time. I hope it stays away.

Skygreen, sometimes these interesting-looking but not desireable plants are not native, but come as passengers on various things...birds being the only one I can think of at the moment. They cling to agricultural carriers -- stuff like that. Do you know the history of this one?

skygreen
12-08-2006, 09:53
T At that time it became illegal to have it on your property. I haven't seen it for a very long time. I hope it stays away.

Skygreen, sometimes these interesting-looking but not desireable plants are not native, but come as passengers on various things...birds being the only one I can think of at the moment. They cling to agricultural carriers -- stuff like that. Do you know the history of this one?
It was brought from Europe and was used as an insecticide - mosquito repellant as medicine for intestinal problems & worms. It was also used in Colonial America as a preservative meat was packed with Tansy so it would keep longer and it was put in coffins. Some isolated compounds with fungicidal and antibacterial properties have been found in Tansy . The main use however was as an abortifacient I think there are some references to Tansy in some old folk songs which would have been understood at one time as a reference to the consequenses of " loose " morals

Peggy

Major Tom
14-08-2006, 20:43
This is Tansy a perennial herb The yellow, strong-scented, bitter-tasting flowers are in flat-topped clusters at the tops of the plant. This plant can be an abortafacient in large doses There have been some deaths resulting from attempts at medicinal use .

Thanks for this Peggy. :) Not recommended for internal use then if one of the side effects is death. :P A mosquito repellent? Do you know any recipes?

sometimes these interesting-looking but not desireable plants

I suppose any plant can be a pest given the right conditions. I've found tansy useful for increasing fruit-set with my grape vines - some sort of undocumented companion perhaps? Perhaps just a local companion. ;)

Red Emma
15-08-2006, 03:25
I suppose I shouldn't post these half-remembered anecdotes, but here goes.

A friend had a cook book called, "Cooking in the Colonies." It was, of course published in England, but I don't remember the publishing date. Among the recipes was something from George Washington's household, a Tansy Pudding. I didn't pay attention to it at all, and we moved to another state. After Oregon made Tansy illegal, I frequently wondered what was in it. But my friend had moved, too, and I lost touch with her.

Also, there was a recipe in the colonies' cook book for Kangaroo. Tail, maybe, but I'm not sure.

ravenest
16-08-2006, 12:41
kanga tail soup is v.yummy, better with native herbs than potatoe and onion.

It is my firm belief that road kill should not be wasted!

Red Emma
16-08-2006, 12:49
kanga tail soup is v.yummy, better with native herbs than potatoe and onion.

Is this true or are you having us on a bit? To me they seem such great creatures that it's hard to think of eating one.

What native herbs do you prefer?

Blessings,

Betty