PDA

View Full Version : London Blue Topaz


Briar Rose
22-11-2007, 13:13
Looks like London Blue Topaz is off the Christmas market in most jewelry shops do to it being irrated. The gemstone can't pass the safety standards of testing for it to be legally imported into the USA.

Just thought ya'll might like to know. Sure hope ya'll aren't using it for any healing.

baba-prague
23-11-2007, 04:33
Oh! Thanks for that. I was actually eyeing up some earrings on Etsy as the colour is fantastic. Hmm, I don't think I want something irradiated hanging in my ears so I'll give them a miss. Is there a link anywhere to a list of unsafe stones to avoid?

Briar Rose
23-11-2007, 04:54
I don't know. I read the article about the Topaz in the Jewlers Magazine.

Here's some info:

http://www.nrc.gov/reading-rm/doc-collections/fact-sheets/irradiated-gemstones.html



about buying gemstones:



http://www.kevincoffee.com/travel/purchasing_phony_gemstones.htm


So far, this is what I have found.

I am learning that alot gemstones are either irrated or heat treated to bring out their color. I think that most are heat treated. And that is safe.

I am not sure if you read any of my posts on Vaseline glass , but that has unsafe amounts of uranium that give off a backroom radiation.

I will know more when I start studying for the diamond and color gemstone certification in January. Yippy!!!!!!!!! I am ahppy about that. And I'll keep everyone up to date about what I learn about irrated gems.

Master_Margarita
23-11-2007, 05:30
Here (http://www.nationaljewelernetwork.com/njn/content_display/colored_stones/e3i51ae9c03a82458d57e63fd8a704a6a96) is an article about something from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. So it may not be all that bad.

Here (http://www.nrc.gov/reading-rm/doc-collections/fact-sheets/irradiated-gemstones.html) is the US NRC's Fact Sheet on Irradiated Gemstones, dated November 8, 2007.

Blue topaz is currently for sale, perfectly legally, on amazon.com.

My research continues...

M_M~

Briar Rose
23-11-2007, 05:37
http://www.modernjeweler.com/print/Modern-Jeweler/Is-Blue-Topaz-Illegal/1$428


Here's the article from the Modern Jeweler Magazine.

Home » Modern Jeweler » AUGUST 2007 Issue » Magazine Article
ModernJeweler.com |
Home Page


More News From Modern Jeweler
More From The AUGUST 2007 Issue
More News From Cheryl Kremkow, Editor-In-Chief

Most Read Most E-mailed E-mail Article Print Article | Save Article | License Article


Is Blue Topaz Illegal?
by Cheryl Kremkow, Editor-In-Chief
The Kay Jewelers store on West 34th Street in New York carries blue sapphire, tanzanite, and aquamarine. What you won’t find in this store, however, is a single blue topaz. And you won’t find any blue topaz in any of the other 1,332 Sterling Jewelers stores across the country either.

That’s because the nation’s largest specialty jewelry retailer recalled blue topaz from all of its stores in June 2007.

The action was in response to a May 24 certified letter that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission sent to major jewelry retailers across the country, including Wal-Mart and J.C. Penney, alerting them to the fact that the NRC requires irradiation facilities and importers of neutron-irradiated topaz to be licensed. The letter, signed by Robert O’Connell, also asked retailers to send the NRC a list of their topaz suppliers and to inform the NRC whether the blue topaz they carried was treated by electrons or neutrons. They were given 30 days to respond.

According to NRC regulations, neutron-irradiated blue topaz can only be imported and sold into this market by someone who is licensed to do so by the NRC. The holder of this “Exempt Distribution License” can sell the material freely to retailers or consumers. No additional license or control is required for possession or sale after the initial import or release in the U.S. The catch is that there currently aren’t any exempt distribution license holders. Therefore most blue topaz on the market has not been imported in compliance with government regulations.

“When we learned that our suppliers were not in compliance, we investigated the regulations,” says Sterling Jewelers marketing director David Bouffard. “In June, when we realized that our suppliers were going to require more time to come into compliance, we removed all irradiated gemstones from our stores.”

The reaction of retailers, manufacturers, and industry associations to the NRC letter has varied. Most are still trying to determine what the NRC’s new aggressive stance means for sales of blue topaz jewelry in the U.S. J.C. Penney has also stopped selling blue topaz in response to the letter.

At the Zales Jewelers store next to Kay’s on West 34th Street, blue topaz jewelry is still available. “We are aware of this issue but to my knowledge we did not get a letter,” says David Sternblitz, Zale Corporation vice president. “It’s premature to lay out our response. We’ve joined the Jewelers Vigilance Committee task force on the issue. We do have a vendor code of conduct that requires our vendors to comply with the law but my understanding is that there are no health issues so I think we should wait to meet with the NRC to understand the issue better.”

The NRC has announced a public meeting on the issue on July 26 at the Commission’s Maryland headquarters. Details are available on the NRC’s website’s Public Meeting Schedule. Modern Jeweler will report on the meeting in our September 2007 issue.

FIXING THE FRAMEWORK

The NRC says that its actions were motivated by concerns that the rules in place for ensuring safe distribution of blue topaz are not working.

“Our concern is that the regulatory framework has not been maintained and we want to restore it,” says David McIntyre of the NRC public affairs office. “Does that mean we are going to prosecute mom and pop jewelry stores? No. We want to work with the industry. If we get the regulatory structure fixed, retailers won’t have to worry.”

Should retailers stop selling blue topaz? “Not yet, certainly,” McIntyre says. “The letter sought information, it didn’t require action. At this point the NRC isn’t requesting action.” He says the NRC has three goals. First, the agency wants to determine how to fix the situation for the future. For example, can someone be licensed so that the gems can be imported properly? Second, the NRC wants to find a solution for all the gems in distribution now. “Is there a way that we can be reassured that they are safe? We’re hoping to get ideas from the industry and find a way that they can still be distributed,” McIntyre says.

The third goal of the NRC is to let the industry know that its jurisdiction over irradiated gems, including topaz, is expanding, thanks to the Energy Policy Act of 2005.

NEUTRON VERSUS ELECTRON

NRC regulations, which went into effect in 1988, currently cover only gems treated by neutron irradiation in a reactor. In blue topaz, this means “ London” blue topaz and “Swiss” and all other fancy blue shades, both the dark blue and intense blue topaz colors. Some blue topaz, which generally has a paler “sky blue” color, is irradiated instead by electrons in an accelerator.

And accelerator-irradiation is currently regulated only by the states. There is no current licensing requirement for importers of electron-irradiated topaz. But there soon will be. In response to the Energy Policy Act of 2005, the NRC is expanding its jurisdiction to include regulation of all accelerator-irradiated materials, too.

New regulations requiring a license for the release or import of electron-irradiated blue topaz take effect around January 2008. Dates will vary state by state. There is expected to be a grace period for selling electron-irradiated topaz imported or released before the regulation goes into effect.

There are no statistics on the amount of neutron-irradiated topaz as compared to electron on the market today. Most dealers estimate that neutron irradiated is two-thirds to three-quarters of the market. At least one retailer who received the NRC letter sent back all its London blue topaz jewelry to have the stones swapped out for sky blue.

But most retailers interviewed for this article don’t know whether they are selling electron or neutron irradiated blue topaz.

When the regulation of blue topaz began in the ’90s, much of the blue topaz sold was either irradiated in the U.S. at facilities like the University of Missouri, the leading neutron irradiation facility in the country, or IRT, a California linear accelerator. What wasn’t irradiated in the U.S. was imported by large loose gemstone wholesalers who specialized in blue topaz and were familiar with the treatment process and regulations.

Today much of the blue topaz jewelry sold in this country enters already set into jewelry. The wholesalers, manufacturers, and retailers who import this jewelry are not aware of the issues with irradiation and may not have any knowledge of how or where the inexpensive gems were treated.

INDUSTRY RESPONSE

Retailers who received the letter contacted their suppliers to find out more about blue topaz irradiation. And they also contacted industry associations to find out more about the regulations regarding blue topaz.

“The JVC has informed people who have asked that we are not able to assure people that blue topaz has entered the country in compliance with the law,” says Cecilia Gardner, Jewelers Vigilance Committee president, CEO, and general counsel.

The JVC sent out a “compliance alert” to its members and press on July 10. In it the JVC said: “Retailers now offering irradiated gemstones for sale should consider what appropriate action to take, including but not limited to, removing these products for sale from their counters. There is no health and safety issue known to the JVC. This alert pertains primarily to blue topaz, and could apply to other irradiated gemstones that you offer for sale.”

JVC, Jewelers of America, and the American Gem Trade Association plan to attend the July 26 meeting with the NRC.

After consulting with legal counsel, JA sent a detailed summary of the NRC regulations to its members. “JA has long advocated that retailers begin to research and understand their supply chains, so that they might become more familiar with their suppliers' business practices. It was also the reason that JA became a founding member of CRJP, so that retailers could work together with their suppliers on issues within the larger industry supply chain,” says Peggy Jo Donohue, JA director of public affairs. “The irradiated gemstone issue, and the questions surrounding the NRC's recent enforcement actions on its licensing requirements, are a perfect example of why retailers must begin to more thoroughly understand how their products arrive in their stores. Consumers are already asking these questions and JA members will continue to work on efforts to supply responsible answers.”

IRRADIATION: NOT JUST TOPAZ

The NRC letter only mentions blue topaz. But since the new regulations will apply to all materials irradiated in an accelerator, not just topaz, they may also require importers to be licensed to import any other gems irradiated in an accelerator. That includes irradiated diamonds. It may also include some green quartz/prasiolite, lemon citrine/oro verde, smoky quartz, golden beryl, kunzite, morganite, and tourmaline.

Because most irradiation is done in gemstone producing countries, it is difficult to say what procedures are used. Although quartz and tourmaline are traditionally enhanced by more affordable irradiation with cobalt 60, the availability of accelerators around the world for commercial irradiation means that some other gemstones may be irradiated in an accelerator. Any that is would technically become a NRC-controlled substance.

Meanwhile, aside from characteristic colors associated with different processes, it is not possible to easily separate neutron and electron irradiated topaz or electron and gamma irradiated quartz.

LICENSE REQUIREMENTS

The complexity of the regulations and the difficulty of obtaining licenses mean it is unlikely that anyone will become licensed by January 2008.

When the NRC regulations first took effect in the ’90s, there were several exempt distribution licensees, including the University of Missouri. Today, the University of Missouri treats blue topaz for a single client, who exports all the topaz it treats, so it let its license to release to unlicensed customers expire. Also licensed in 1990 were General Atomics in San Diego and Alnor Instruments in Skokie, Illinois. Neither still holds a license.

The Gemological Institute of America obtained both possession and exempt distribution licenses in 1992. The institute spent an estimated $200,000 to set up an advanced testing facility with sophisticated detectors, a staff nuclear engineer to oversee the operation, storage and disposal facilities, and automation that kept fees affordable. In 1994, for lots with a total carat weight of 4,500 carats or more of one-carat or larger stones, the fee was $0.50 per carat.

But there was no demand from the industry for testing. There were no customers for topaz testing after the first few months. “The regulations to provide the service were quite extensive,” says Tom Moses. “And the service was not successful. But during test runs and the few lots we did receive, we did not find residual radioactivity in the topaz we did test. In the 15 years GIA had a license, we maybe tested 5 to 10 stones that had residual radioactivity and only one of those was topaz. We used the detector for research but virtually no one used the service.” GIA gave up its license a few years ago and two years ago donated its germanium detector to a local university. At that point, there no longer were any exempt distribution licensees.

The JVC says that the industry needs someone to become licensed. “We’re encouraging as many entities who can become licensed to do so as soon as possible,” Gardner says.

How will all this controversy affect the market for what is probably the biggest selling colored gemstone in carats? Since this issue is not likely to be resolved before this holiday season, this December’s birthstone is not likely to be blue topaz for some retailers. But that’s not a problem for Sterling Jewelers. “We follow the AGTA recommendation of tanzanite,” Bouffard says.

Note: Previous versions of this story, including the printed August 2007 issue of Modern Jeweler, included an incorrect statement that Sterling Jewelers received a letter from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Sterling did not receive a letter. Modern Jeweler regrets the error.

Master_Margarita
23-11-2007, 05:40
http://www.modernjeweler.com/print/Modern-Jeweler/Is-Blue-Topaz-Illegal/1$428


Here's the article from the Modern Jeweler Magazine.

Heavensvault, there is information from the NRC that supersedes this article. This article references a July 26 meeting, the NRC information on the website is dated 11/8/2007.

M_M~

Master_Margarita
23-11-2007, 05:44
Looks like London Blue Topaz is off the Christmas market in most jewelry shops do to it being irrated. The gemstone can't pass the safety standards of testing for it to be legally imported into the USA.

Just thought ya'll might like to know. Sure hope ya'll aren't using it for any healing.

From the NRC fact sheet:

Am I selling "contraband"?
No. Current inventories in retail outlets and distribution channels have not been distributed by an NRC licensee, but these should not be considered contraband. The NRC is working to resolve regulatory issues regarding the current inventory of irradiated gemstones.

Should I stop selling these popular gemstones?
That is a business decision only you can make. The NRC has sought information from industry about how irradiated gemstones reach the U.S. market, but the agency has not requested any action, including a halt in sales.

I read that there was a ban on selling irradiated gemstones. Is this true?
No. When the NRC approached industry groups earlier this year seeking information about the distribution of irradiated gemstones, several retailers pulled their stones from the market in response. This was a voluntary action on their part. The NRC did not request or impose any such action.

Master_Margarita
23-11-2007, 05:49
London blue topaz currently available for sale on amazon.com (http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_ss_gw/103-4693392-6867848?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=london+blue+topaz&x=16&y=27).

M_M~

Briar Rose
23-11-2007, 05:51
Okay. And thank you for your interest as well. My main concern is
*how safe* are these irradiated gemstones?

I got rid of all my Vaseline glass beads because they were unsafe.

I have tons of semi-precious briolettes that I make jewelry with, and I am wondering... where does all this end? How safe is it all?

Master_Margarita
23-11-2007, 06:02
Okay. And thank you for your interest as well. My main concern is
*how safe* are these irradiated gemstones?

I got rid of all my Vaseline glass beads because they were unsafe.

I have tons of semi-precious briolettes that I make jewelry with, and I am wondering... where does all this end? How safe is it all?

I can appreciate that.

Let's look at the fact sheet:

Is it dangerous to wear blue topaz?
No. The NRC has no indication that wearing irradiated gemstones can be harmful. There have been no reported cases of anyone being harmed by wearing irradiated gemstones.

Should I stop wearing blue topaz?
From a safety standpoint, there is no reason to stop wearing blue topaz or any other irradiated gems.

If you are really concerned about the level of radioactivity of the gems you have, you could get a Geiger counter and check your current gems for radiation levels.

I think you were wise to check this out in the first place--consider that glow-in-the-dark watch faces used to have *radium* in them--but in this case upon investigation there seems little to worry about.

M_M~

Briar Rose
23-11-2007, 06:05
Most of the Crystals we use are to draw out the properties, using them for healing. So, is it really safe to use the irradiated ones? That's the big question!

I'd like to know everyone's opinion.

And here's even more head bending info:







Search Options
Index | Site Map | FAQ | Facility Info | Reading Rm | New | Help | Glossary | Contact Us
Protecting People and the EnvironmentUNITED STATES NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION About NRCThe Commission Statutory Authority Strategic Plan Budget & Performance Organization & Functions Locations History Values Policy Making Radiation Protection How We Regulate Grants Civil Rights Nuclear
Reactors Operating Reactor Locations Reactor Quick Links Power Reactors Non-Power Reactors Operating Reactors Operator Licensing New Reactor Licensing Reactor Safety Research Advisory Comm (ACRS) Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities Nuclear
Materials Fuel Cycle Facility Locations Uranium Mill Locations Material Quick Links Special Nuclear Material Source Material Byproduct Material Med, Academic & Ind Uses Fuel Cycle Facilities Source Materials Facilities Transportation Materials Research Advisory Comm (ACMUI) Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities Radioactive
Waste Waste Quick Links Low-Level Waste High-Level Waste Uranium Mill Tailings LLW Disposal HLW Disposal Spent Fuel Storage Spent Fuel Transport Waste Research Advisory Comm (ACNW&M) Nuclear
Security NRC Responsibilities Domestic Safeguards Radioactive Material Security Facility Protection Nuclear Material Control International Safeguards Information Security Emergency Preparedness &; Public Meetings
& Involvement Public Meeting Schedule Commission Schedule Conferences & Symposia Documents for Comment Brochures & Fact Sheets Involving Stakeholders Info Quality Guidelines Rulemaking Process Licensing Enforcement Hearing Process Hearing Applications Home > Electronic Reading Room > Document Collections > Fact Sheets > Fact Sheet on Irradiated Gemstones

Fact Sheet on Irradiated Gemstones
Background
Printable Version

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has received numerous inquiries from the jewelry industry and consumers regarding gemstones (most notably, blue topaz) that have been irradiated in a nuclear reactor or accelerator to enhance their color. These inquiries reflect confusion- and some misinformation - the agency wishes to clear up about the regulation of these stones and their safety.

The NRC has no reason to believe irradiated gemstones currently on the market are unsafe. The NRC has not requested that jewelers take these stones off the market.


Irradiated gemstones fall under the NRC’s regulatory jurisdiction because the process of enhancing the stones’ color - through bombardment with either neutrons or electrons - can make the gems slightly radioactive. After irradiation, the stones are typically set aside for a couple of months to allow any radioactivity to decay. NRC requires that the initial distribution of these stones be by a distributor licensed by the NRC. This distributor would conduct radiological surveys of each batch of gemstones to ensure that any residual radioactivity falls below regulatory limits. After the initial distribution, the stones would no longer be regulated - in other words, subsequent distributors, jewelers, other retailers and consumers do not need to be licensed.

Two factors have contributed to the current market concern. First, the NRC contacted industry representatives earlier this year for information about how irradiated gemstones are reaching the U.S. market. Many gemstones currently are imported and distributed by a number of companies without an NRC distribution license. The NRC has worked with industry groups to re-establish the necessary regulatory framework. Two distribution licenses have now been issued for neutron-irradiated topaz, and other applications are being reviewed.

Second, new NRC regulations take effect Nov. 30 under the Energy Policy Act of 2005, which gave NRC jurisdiction over radioactive materials produced in accelerators. Most of these materials are medical isotopes used in diagnosis and therapy, but the new regulations also apply to irradiated gemstones. (Previously, NRC regulations applied only to gemstones irradiated in reactors.) Information about these regulations and NRC’s transition plan for their implementation is available here on the NRC Web site. Once these regulations become effective, distribution of all irradiated gemstones will fall under the requirements described above.

The NRC is working to resolve regulatory questions about irradiated gemstones currently on the market. Information about this action will be updated on this page as warranted.

CONTACTS:

For regulatory or technical issues: Joe DeCicco, (301) 415-7833

For questions about applying for a license:
Bruce Carrico, (301) 415-7826
Anthony Kirkwood, (301) 415-6140
Richard Struckmeyer, (301) 415-5477

For media and public inquiries:
David McIntyre, (301) 415-8200

Frequently Asked Questions on Irradiated Gemstones
For consumers:

Why and how are gemstones irradiated?
Does irradiation make the stones radioactive?
Is it dangerous to wear blue topaz?
Should I stop wearing blue topaz?
A jeweler told me it is now illegal to sell blue topaz because it causes cancer - is this true?
How can I tell if my jewelry has been irradiated?
Will I receive a radiation "dose" from wearing blue topaz or other irradiated gems?
For Jewelers and Distributors:

Why is NRC scaring industry and disrupting the sale of irradiated gemstones?
Do I need an NRC license to sell blue topaz or other irradiated gems?
Why is an "exempt distribution" license required for the initial distribution of irradiated gemstones?
Am I selling "contraband"?
Should I stop selling these popular gemstones?
I read that there was a ban on selling irradiated gemstones. Is this true?
Why do some irradiated gemstones fall under NRC’s authority, while others do not?
Why and how are gemstones irradiated?
Gemstones are irradiated in order to enhance and deepen their color. They can be irradiated in a nuclear reactor (neutron bombardment), an accelerator (electron bombardment), or by exposure to gamma rays in a cobalt irradiator. The most commonly treated stone is topaz, which becomes blue as a result of the exposure to radiation.

Does irradiation make the stones radioactive?
Possibly. Generally, the longer the stones are exposed to radiation - and the more intense the radiation - the deeper and more attractive the resulting color; also, this increases the chance that trace elements in the stone will be "activated" and become radioactive. It is important to note that activation is most likely to occur in stones that are treated in a nuclear reactor, though treatment in an accelerator can also make stones radioactive. Treatment in a cobalt irradiator does not render stones radioactive.

Is it dangerous to wear blue topaz?
No. The NRC has no indication that wearing irradiated gemstones can be harmful. There have been no reported cases of anyone being harmed by wearing irradiated gemstones.

Should I stop wearing blue topaz?
From a safety standpoint, there is no reason to stop wearing blue topaz or any other irradiated gems.

A jeweler told me it is now illegal to sell blue topaz because it causes cancer - is this true?
No. There is no reason to believe blue topaz or any other irradiated gemstone poses any health risk, much less cancer. The NRC has not advised, requested or ordered any retailers or distributors to stop selling irradiated gemstones.

How can I tell if my jewelry has been irradiated?
A skilled gemologist might be able to tell by examining the gemstone. However, it can be very difficult to determine whether a stone has been treated in a reactor, accelerator or irradiator. Any residual radiation can be detected with a hand-held survey meter; however, determining whether the radiation is below NRC’s regulatory limits requires a trained radiation professional to use sophisticated survey equipment.

Will I receive a radiation "dose" from wearing blue topaz or other irradiated gems?
Possibly, but it would be an extremely small dose. A study done by the NRC estimated that a person wearing a blue topaz stone at the highest level of radioactivity allowed for distribution under NRC regulations would receive an annual dose of 0.03 millirem (NUREG 1717, page 2-21). By contrast, a chest X-ray is about 60 millirem.

Why is NRC scaring industry and disrupting the sale of irradiated gemstones?
Earlier this year, the NRC contacted several large retailers of blue topaz seeking information about how the stones reached the U.S. market. The agency sought this information in order to restore the regulatory framework for the proper distribution of these gems under the Atomic Energy Act and NRC regulations. The NRC did not request any specific actions of industry. Industry groups and retailers have cooperated with the NRC in its efforts. The NRC continues to survey batches of stones for radiation. Surveys conducted to date have not given the agency any indication that current inventories are a health risk.

Do I need an NRC license to sell blue topaz or other irradiated gems?
Probably not. NRC regulations cover material made radioactive in a nuclear reactor (and, as of Nov. 30, 2007, in accelerators as well). The initial transfer of these materials must be made according to an NRC distribution license. If the radioactivity levels are below certain limits in NRC’s regulations, the materials become "exempt" from further regulation, and further distribution, including to the end consumer, does not need to be licensed. This means individual jewelers do not need to be licensed provided the stones they sell were initially distributed by an NRC licensee.

In early November 2007, the NRC issued two distribution licenses for blue topaz, and other license applications are under review.

Why is an "exempt distribution" license required for the initial distribution of irradiated gemstones?
The license provides a safeguard against the possibility that stones might reach the market too soon after irradiation, with radioactivity above NRC limits. The distribution licensee is required to perform sophisticated surveys to verify that the stones meet NRC requirements for exempt distribution.

Am I selling "contraband"?
No. Current inventories in retail outlets and distribution channels have not been distributed by an NRC licensee, but these should not be considered contraband. The NRC is working to resolve regulatory issues regarding the current inventory of irradiated gemstones.

Should I stop selling these popular gemstones?
That is a business decision only you can make. The NRC has sought information from industry about how irradiated gemstones reach the U.S. market, but the agency has not requested any action, including a halt in sales.

I read that there was a ban on selling irradiated gemstones. Is this true?
No. When the NRC approached industry groups earlier this year seeking information about the distribution of irradiated gemstones, several retailers pulled their stones from the market in response. This was a voluntary action on their part. The NRC did not request or impose any such action.

Why do some irradiated gemstones fall under NRC’s authority, while others do not?
This is simply because of the way the law has been written. The Atomic Energy Act gave NRC regulatory authority over radioactive material produced in reactors. In the Energy Policy Act of 2005, Congress extended this authority to include accelerator-produced radioactive material that is used for a commercial, medical, or research activity. NRC regulations implementing this expanded authority take effect Nov. 30, 2007. Information on these regulations and the agency’s transition plan for implementing them are available here on the NRC Web site.

Some stones treated at low energy in an accelerator may not actually become radioactive, so they would not qualify as radioactive material under NRC authority. Also, stones treated in a cobalt irradiator do not become radioactive.

November 8, 2007




Privacy Policy | Site Disclaimer
Friday, November 09, 2007

Emily
23-11-2007, 22:36
I wonder if Mystic Topaz falls into any of these categories? I stopped wearing mine, earrings and necklace, after I got headaches and quite a few ear infections. I loved the colours of these jems but I don't think they were doing me any good. I steer clear of all topaz now.

I've just googled Mystic Topaz - apparently its a colourless topaz with a layer of titanium on the bottom to reflect the light and show the colours - not too much for me to be sensitive to, so it must be the white topaz itself.

memries
23-11-2007, 23:29
Thank you for the information Heaven's Vault. It is nice to know in any case what we are buying in the way of crystals. Whether what you buy is enhanced or not, safe or not. I always hated it that yellow diamonds are heat treated.

Alta
24-11-2007, 00:18
I was pretty sure that Mystic Topaz was coated... I saw it discussed on TV once. I have some blue topaz, a pendant and some earrings but don't think they are London Blue, but some lesser colour of blue.

I know that almost all jewelery stones are treated in some way, heating being the most common.

HearthCricket
24-11-2007, 03:04
Interesting topic, as topaz is my birthstone. Real topaz, meaning Imeprial Topaz, is gorgeous. I love it. It used to be in all the stores. Now you can rarely find it. It is pale yellow with a pinkish/peach colour.

Then, suddenly Citrine showed up and everyone wanted the brighter yellow colour. I really never cared for it, though I do have a necklace and earring of it.

Then came blue topaz. I have 1 pair of earrings, and I am not worried about them being irradiated. I pretty much figured they were in order to get that unique and brighter colour. I just happened to wear a lot of blue and this was lighter in colour than my sapphires, so a nice change. And I only wear them once in a while....not every day or even every week...or even every month! The cost was low, anyhow.

I think it will be interesting to see what stores will do in having to pull this item and probably future ones. We will see more pearls, diamonds, sapphires and rubies, but a lot less choices. But here is to brining back pretty and inexpensive gems like Amethyst and Aquamarine, as well as the rarer but far more beautiful Imperial Topaz!

Master_Margarita
24-11-2007, 04:29
Most of the Crystals we use are to draw out the properties, using them for healing. So, is it really safe to use the irradiated ones? That's the big question!

HeavensVault, I see a question within your question.

As you probably gather, I'm somewhat skeptical about any physical danger to us from London blue topaz, based at least on the materials I read from the NRC.

A totally different question, and one I think you may be raising here--but I don't want to put words in your mouth--is whether irradiation of stones has any effect on their psychic or healing properties. Does nuking the stones damage or destroy those added qualities?

If that's what you're asking, I am not skeptical at all and think you have a very good point.

M_M~

Briar Rose
24-11-2007, 05:32
Very interesting replies. Thank you all.

Memries~ diamonds can have a natural yellow tint;
graded by color D through Z+
diamonds graded K,L, or M faint yellow
graded N,O,P,Q, or R very light yellow
graded S,T,U,V,W,X, y, or Z

and I have seem some very yellow untreated diamonds.

and HC: I am so sadden that Imperial Topaz isn't around (that much? or really not at all), I have forgotten about that until you mentioned it. You got any picutres you can take in the sunlight, please?

And you are going to start to see more exotic gemstones like,

crome diopside (kelly geen)
tsavorite (another green stone and expensive)
apatite (green to blue)
diaspore (green to clearish)
heliodor (yellow)
morganite (pinkish to purpleishpink)


oh my God~ I think I am in love with gemstones.

And the Mystic Topaz coating will eventually wear off. If you buy it, see if you are offered a care plan with it, so that they can fix or replace it.