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Quote:
Originally Posted by fools_fool
The Book of the Law itself advocates ego gratification through passion and violence. Crowley himself had a difficult time accepting its message. For years after transcribing it he remained on the path of Yoga, Buddhism, and other forms of transcendentalism, even losing the original manuscript until rediscovering it years later. Here are some quotes from the Book of the Law:
I think I will let the book speak for itself at this point:
The fool readeth this Book of the Law, and it's comment; & he understandeth it not.

Ever heard of the dangers of literalism?
Can you name one religious scripture from around the world that you would be prepared to take at face value? Can you name me one scripture that is not written using metaphor and symbol?
If not why do you insist on a literal reading of the Book of the Law?

Many of the worlds religious scriptures are full of dark and threatening imagery. The Book of the Law is just one among many.
See the Tibetan Book of the Dead with it's description of the Hrukas and Dakinis who make Ra Hoor Khuit look like a pussy cat.
The Bible is full of violence, most of it commanded by God himself! Nearly everyone the hebrews meet they are commanded to kill.
How about the Bhagavad Gita where Krishna urges Arjuna to start killing all his friends and relatives!

Is this all supposed to be taken as literal truth? Brain dead fundamentalists of all creeds like to think so.
Quote:
Originally Posted by fools_fool
Aiwass, who seems almost totally lacking human moral feeling, appears to be more Devil than Angel. Indeed Crowley would eventually come this conclusion himself.

"And Her(the Scarlet Woman's)Concoction shall be sweet in our mixed mouths, the Sacrament that giveth thanks to Aiwaz, our Lord God the Devil." - Ailester Crowley, The Magical Record, 22 July, 1920
Your quote proves nothing. Crowley's use of the word devil is never meant in the negative Christian sense. It only has meaning within the self-referential theology of Thelema. See Crowley's description of the Devil in the Book of Thoth.
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