daydreams and tarot

numbrel

Does habitual daydreaming affect tarot readings? Last year I was very depressed and spent a lot of time creating daydreams of a much more interesting life for myself. It got to the point where it was interfering with my life.

I took steps to improve my life and I am not depressed any more, but the daydreams have been a hard habit to break, although I have cut back on how much time I spend on them. After all, they are cheap and always available.

I have just begun to learn tarot and so far the "readings" I have done for myself have been very positive and also seem to correlate to my daydreaming. My daydreams have no basis in reality and will never come true.

Is it possible my daydreams are influencing the cards? or just my interpretation of them?

Thanks for your help.

numbrel

ps. the one "unpleasent" card that has come up three times is The Devil - which I interpret as warning me against spending so much time on daydreaming.
 

blue

Numbrel;

Our daydreams effect everything in our lives. In a way, we all daydream all the time, most of us simply don?t know it. They can effect us for good or bad depending on what motivates them and whether they are habitual or temporary reveries.

This is a very interesting subject you?ve brought up. As you?ve already witnessed first hand, the key to self-transformation is to be aware of our dreams and daydreams, aware of the dialog we hold with our selves when we are not aware of what we are doing. You are to be commended for the evolution you have already effected in your life. Most people simply allow inertia to carry them along with out ever waking up to the fact that they are creating their world. Never realizing that to a large extent can change it. I am very impressed!

Another aspect of daydreaming (I?m using the term in it?s broadest sense) is that it is a powerful tool for unlocking the symbolism in Tarot and many other facets of our lives. Guided daydreams can expand the understanding we have of the dreams that present themselves to us in sleep but remain half hidden. After all, symbols is how Tarot and much of our daily lives express deeper meaning.

There probably isn?t one person you know who didn?t dream about being someone else as a child. Consciously or otherwise we often incorporate parts of our youthful fantasies into our personas only to find out years later that we have truly become the person we dreamed about. You?ve stumbled onto a very powerful tool for chance and exploration. Be very careful of what you tell your self won?t come true from your daydreams. You may be very surprised.

PS. One aspect the Devil card teaches us is how the dreams we dream of ourselves can limit our freedom to grow as individuals. Like I said, be careful of what you tell yourself will never happen from your dreams.

Numbrel, thanks for the post. I've found it very thought provoking.
 

Marion

Hi numbrel,
May I recommend a book?
"Invisible Masters" by George Weinberg.
It is not specifically about daydreams, but about various behaviors that from time to time actually seem to get the upper hand in your life. It is very helpful and lets you see this behavior in a new light.
Remember, the solution becomes the problem. You created the daydreams to help with the depression.... now the depression is gone but the daydreams stay and become a problem themselves.
 

bec

Your question is " does daydreams affect tarot?" My response have to be " oh yes indeed they will" especially in the amount of time and effort you?ve put into it. I think the devil indicates your massive changes in life, you turning the depression to something positive, in that department I would be more worried to get it reversed after all that struggle - where it indicates stagnation in life - so I cheer for you getting TD - you have won a signafigant battle with yourself !! As to whether your dreams ever will come true - well not as long as you tell yourself they won?t - once you start believe in them, I agree, you might be surprised in the great power of positive thinking and visualizing (NLP) Program yourself to say " I can do this simply because I dare give it a try" instead of " It?ll never happen".
My deepest respect for what you?ve been through.
 

numbrel

Thanks for all the thoughts.

My daydreaming has been very escapist. I often put myself back in time in as a princess or some such stuff that really does not have anything to do with my life.

Having said that, I realized from things blue and bec said that I have been trying to rid myself of my habit in the wrong way. I have been trying to not daydream at all. I will try coming up with stories that are possible for me to achieve and see what happens then.

Marion, thank you for the book recommendation I will look into it.

Thanks for the different perspective you all have shown me.

numbrel
 

bec

I believe that?s an important step you?ve decided to take - making your daydreams achieveable gives you a goal - and that?s when daydreams becomes a (in the modern world we live in) very rare and precious gift - may life be good to you :)
 

raeanne

I apologize for looking at this in the worst possible light but I feel there needs to be something mentioned. Daydreaming can become addictive. It?s free and enjoyable so what?s the problem? The problem is that it can lead to a disassociation with reality. IF the daydreams are interfering with your daily life then you may very well have a problem that needs professional assistance. Since you stated that your daydreams cannot come true, I assume that you mean something like you are living in an alternative universe type thing. Everyone daydreams and they can be a great help to us and our creativity. But, nothing is as good as real life because it is REAL. Daydream for a break or a vacation but live in reality. If you can?t do that then it is time to go to the local mental health center. I apologize if I have over reacted to your post but I had a friend in college that let daydreams get out of hand. I know how far this can go and it can get very bad if not controlled. I hope the best for you.
 

truthsayer

Quote:numbrel (16 Oct, 2001 11:12):
Does habitual daydreaming affect tarot readings? Last year I was very depressed and spent a lot of time creating daydreams of a much more interesting life for myself. It got to the point where it was interfering with my life.

I took steps to improve my life and I am not depressed any more, but the daydreams have been a hard habit to break, although I have cut back on how much time I spend on them. After all, they are cheap and always available.

I have just begun to learn tarot and so far the "readings" I have done for myself have been very positive and also seem to correlate to my daydreaming. My daydreams have no basis in reality and will never come true.

Is it possible my daydreams are influencing the cards? or just my interpretation of them?

Thanks for your help.

numbrel

ps. the one "unpleasent" card that has come up three times is The Devil - which I interpret as warning me against spending so much time on daydreaming.

numbrel,
i don't know what it is about getting closing to the big 4-0 but so often it's a turning point in our lives. i got severely depressed when i was 37. an important thing that i lost was my ability to create a fantasy life or daydream to escape occasionally. i have always used my fantasy life to create new goals for myself, help others, write short stories or poetry, create art, decorate my home, pure entertainment,etc. i knew i was in serious trouble when i could no longer daydream b/c it's always been such an important part of my life. regaining my fantasy life has been an important part of my recovery. using my daydreams i imagined myself in new and different careers and how i might achieve those goals. that's how i decided to go back to college to be a nurse. i had to pass an algebra test to start school. i imagined myself passing to encourage myself while i studied for the test. i passed! every difficulty along the way, i imagine that i successfully overcome it.

daydreaming is a double edged sword. if i had used my daydreams to escape into never neverland i don't think i'd be as far along in recovery as i am. however, if i hadn't regained daydreaming i'd still be depressed. if you like to daydream things that will never come true but might make an interesting story, why not take action and write them up? that would be something productive. if you enjoy writing, then it could become an avenue of meeting other ppl. daydreaming is a sign that you want more from your life and are feeling dissatisfied. look at what you are daydreaming at a symbolic level. are you dreaming about romance or adventure? perhaps this is a symbol that you crave to meet new ppl or have a more exciting life. you can use daydreams as a clue to add things you need in your life like mental stimulation.

i think being able to hold images in your mind adds to your skill as a tarot reader. being able to see things in your mind helps you create "the story" that you are picking up from the cards. if you couldn't do that, your readings would be dull, mundane, and lacking in animation. hone your skill and use it in a positive way. i believe that you can continue to turn this around. :)
 

wulfshado

I didn't see anyone mention this so will add it. Sometimes you can compare day dreaming to shamanic journeying as well as past life escapism. Some good books on the subject are those written by Robert Moss (conscious dreaming, dreams gates, etc) and Journeying by Jeannette M. Gagan, and two books by Christine Jette: Tarot for the Healing Heart, or Tarot Shadow Work.

You might look at any of them. There's an interview with Jette on Tarot Passages book section that might interest you as well.

Wulfie