Managing insecurities while learning

TashaTealeaf

This is a question for the more experienced readers.

How do you get through the "I have no idea what I'm doing" stage of learning tarot? I know enough to know I barely know anything and it's a little overwhelming.

I've done readings for people where they have said it was very accurate, but how do I know those weren't just flukes?

How do I know if I have any potential? How can I be sure that I am improving and not just floundering?
 

Grizabella

Practice makes a big difference in building security. Especially in-person readings.

Accuracy isn't something to strive for in my opinion. Neither is making someone cry. lol Giving meaningful readings that give helpful insight to the sitter is foremost. Then, giving unbiased information that clearly reflects the meaning the cards are supplying, without letting our personal values or opinions taint the reading. For instance, if you have a sitter who is in a relationship with another person who is married, the tendency might be to let our own values against infidelity that keep us from seeing and saying what the cards actually say if the cards indicate there's hope for continuing the relationship. Maybe these two people haven't gained the insight or learned the lessons yet that the relationship is going to impart for them by continuing it for awhile.

It takes time and experience to gain confidence with the cards. There will be many times when a sitter will insist that the reading was way off. That's a really big cause of self-doubt. But as you continue to read, and as there are some of your sitters who return to report back to you what happened that was right in keeping with what you saw in the reading, you'll become more stable and confident.
 

violetdaisy

I don't have a whole lot to say, I don't read for others often. Generally though, having self-doubt is part of the process of learning. It becomes less and less of an issue as you progress and acquire knowledge and experience. Even experts of their fields question themselves occasionally. Knowing that you don't know much can be overwhelming, but also empowering - in that it's a self realization and means that you are getting to know you better. šŸ˜Š
 

TashaTealeaf

Practice makes a big difference in building security. Especially in-person readings.

Accuracy isn't something to strive for in my opinion. Neither is making someone cry. lol Giving meaningful readings that give helpful insight to the sitter is foremost.

This is why I want to do readings. I want to be able to help people gain clarity and control of their lives. I want to provide a service that actually improves people's quality of life.

I did a reading for someone who was going on a difficult path, and they said my reading was exactly what they needed to hear at the moment. It made me incredibly happy to hear that.
 

MissNine

The only way to mastery of anything is an accumulation of successes of the task at hand.
Since you're just beginning, I'm assuming you're reading fur friends?
I would trade free readings for their feedback about how the predictions you made worked out. No specific feedback = no more readings.

And if they are your friends, you can be honest with them about how you aim to get more confident and accurate, but that first, you need some Guinea pigs. Worked like a charm with my friends and over months, I gained enough confidence to start reading for others on here (Internet reading is really different for me than in person readings).
Hope that helps!
 

TashaTealeaf

I don't have a whole lot to say, I don't read for others often. Generally though, having self-doubt is part of the process of learning. It becomes less and less of an issue as you progress and acquire knowledge and experience. Even experts of their fields question themselves occasionally. Knowing that you don't know much can be overwhelming, but also empowering - in that it's a self realization and means that you are getting to know you better. šŸ˜Š

Thank you for this. It's something I know logically, but it's good to hear it from another person.
 

SwordOfTruth

Tarot was a particular system I really couldn't get a handle on in my twenties when I first took it up. I found it too complicated and put it aside in favour of the looser style of oracles. It really took a lot of life lessons for me to begin connecting to the archetypes depicted in the deck. So I guess I'm saying time, familiarity with combinations, and in person readings are a big help in learning to read. A lot of people imagine that to be pressurising but I find online readings the hardest because you are basically blind until the entire reading is done. In-person your querent will tell you immediately if you are off, enabling you to reframe it, look again or garner some information about their situation that makes the card clear.

It also comes down to how many different ways you can see a particular card. In the beginning when all I had to go on was the book meanings it was really difficult to get clear messages. Many book meanings tie cards only to particular aspects of life when they could be relating to something completely different. Getting love cards in a career reading for instance, or all pentacles and swords in a love reading. It takes time to see everything in different lights.
 

TashaTealeaf

The only way to mastery of anything is an accumulation of successes of the task at hand.
Since you're just beginning, I'm assuming you're reading fur friends?
I would trade free readings for their feedback about how the predictions you made worked out. No specific feedback = no more readings.

And if they are your friends, you can be honest with them about how you aim to get more confident and accurate, but that first, you need some Guinea pigs. Worked like a charm with my friends and over months, I gained enough confidence to start reading for others on here (Internet reading is really different for me than in person readings).
Hope that helps!

Basically all my readings are for strangers online. I have trouble reading for people I know because I know too much about them already. I just feel like I'm giving them advice, rather than reading cards.

I'm also afraid that I'll just cold read people rather than read the cards. Working over the internet removes a lot of that risk. All I have is a screen name and a question, so there's only so many assumptions I can make.
 

schizandra

I would just suggest to stop putting pressure on yourself and the Tarot. Tell yourself you're playing, exploring, building a relationship. No need to "know what you're doing" in Tarot, now or ever; knowing you don't know is how you keep improving. :)
 

TashaTealeaf

Tarot was a particular system I really couldn't get a handle on in my twenties when I first took it up. I found it too complicated and put it aside in favour of the looser style of oracles. It really took a lot of life lessons for me to begin connecting to the archetypes depicted in the deck. So I guess I'm saying time, familiarity with combinations, and in person readings are a big help in learning to read. A lot of people imagine that to be pressurising but I find online readings the hardest because you are basically blind until the entire reading is done. In-person your querent will tell you immediately if you are off, enabling you to reframe it, look again or garner some information about their situation that makes the card clear.

It also comes down to how many different ways you can see a particular card. In the beginning when all I had to go on was the book meanings it was really difficult to get clear messages. Many book meanings tie cards only to particular aspects of life when they could be relating to something completely different. Getting love cards in a career reading for instance, or all pentacles and swords in a love reading. It takes time to see everything in different lights.

The reason I like tarot is because of the structure. My problem isn't too few interpretations, but too many. Each card is a complex web of associations with layers upon layers of meaning.

Within the context of a spread, I force myself to pick one meaning and stick with it, unless the sitter gives me a reason to say something different. Or else I'd be listing off a bunch of different possibilities and it'd be overwhelming and unhelpful.

My issue isn't figuring out a meaning for the spread that makes sense, but deciding which fit is best for the situation.