Mapping the The World and La Monde/Il Mondo

Rosanne

As usual I follow all the threads in this section and the links provided. After the Behenian Stars thread and Bardic Origins and most importantly DianaOD's research in to Charles VI cards; my own interest in things Astronomical, Phoenician Abjads, Mamluk cards, Sicily,and the wondering of Tarot and it's beginnings through the images we have now; I purchased a book called Mapping the World by Michael Swift. It is a wonderful resource and might be considered a coffee table book if you have a huge coffee table. It is full of maps from what is still around; mostly what is around to be reproduced is because all maps were, of course, drawn and illuminated by hand, which made the distribution of maps extremely limited; and also they were commissioned for the elite. Many were not intended for navigating, but were considered works of art.
Between 500 AD and 1450 AD called the 'Dark Ages' in Europe (this followed the collapse of the Roman empire and the 'decline of western civilization', the rise of Christianity but more directly the decline of the sciences: "The lamp of scientific knowledge was obscured by the light of religious ecstasy"), knowledge and maps, resided in the hands of religious scribes, who tended to support references in the bible rather than depicting geographic facts, and supporting the idea of a 'flat' earth The earth was drawn as a circle with EAST (Orient) to the top and Jerusalem in the centre. "This is Jerusalem., I have set it in the midst" (Ezekiel 5.5)
The known world was bordered by Cold (N), Heat(S), Ocean (W), Paradise (E); maps of this time are known as "T-in-O" maps. Letter O for the circle of the earth, T formed by Mediterranean (vertical) and Don and Nile (horizontal), separating Asia, Europe and Africa.
There I was looking at two T-in-O maps- the TdM La Monde and the Visconti Il Mondo.
I remembered that as far as Maps went in early Medieval Europe they were often more allegorical or ecclesiastical than cartographic. As I said before during the Medieval period, European maps were dominated by religious views. The T-in-O map was common. So the T has become Christ or Fortune- the device was adapted. The circle became a madorla as in many illustrations and the scarf is sometimes Christ's Cloak and sometimes Fortune's scarf; the known borders become the Evangalists. Maybe today we would border the O with a Sword,Cup,Wand and Coin(and forever argue what goes where).
So if the La Monde was a T-in-O map, it seems very logical that other images from Tarot might well be too.
http://academic.emporia.edu/aberjame/map/h_map/h_map13.jpg

There is more to tell but maybe I will wait and see if this is interesting enough because after 1450 some amazing things happened in the mapping world.....

Thanks to Kwaw for all the bits and pieces he provides, and to DianaOD for her essays that focussed my search. ~Rosanne
 

Rosanne

Here is a typical T-in-O map in a Psalter ca 1270 ( which was not only a prayer book but a primer used to learn to read)
Sorry about the crookedness, but my book is large, and I had to be careful with the scanner. If you look carefully,maybe the green sea shape forms the dancing woman with the wand being what I presume is the Red Sea. Jerusalem is in the center as usual. ~Rosanne
 

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le pendu

Hi Rosanne,

When I was at Oxford earlier this year, I picked up a book which I think you might enjoy. I've only read a little so far, but it is very good, and the images and diagrams are fantastic. It looks like a great match to your interests.

Medieval Views of the Cosmos
Picturing the Universe in the Christian and Islamic Middle Ages

Evelyn Edson Emilie Savage-Smith Terry Jones
128 pages, 250 x 183 x 12 mm
65 colour illustrations & 15 diagrams
ISBN 1851241841
13 Digit ISBN 9781851241842
Paperback
RRP £14.95
Publication 01 Oct 2004

http://www.bodleianbookshop.co.uk/b...t1=300&ds=History&sort=sort_date/d&m=12&dc=34
 

Rosanne

You are sooo right Robert- right up my alley and I will seek it out. I am not eating this month because of the latest book purchases- but what is food compared to Tarot? Many thanks. ~Rosanne
 

DianeOD

Thanks

Thanks for this reference, too.

I grab everything that Emilie Savage-Smith writes. Don't know how I missed hearing about this publication.

About maps: the technical revolution for Europe begins about 1310, with the new gridded maritime-style charts made by the Vesconti of Genoa.(Ves..not Vis..)

However, if you have a look at the Hereford map, made earlier (it may be in your book) you can see how world-maps were already used to assist memory of Biblical history, and the world's natural creatures etc... the sort of thing routinely instilled as basic education (even for the illiterate).

Enjoy.
 

DoctorArcanus

Rosanne said:
There is more to tell but maybe I will wait and see if this is interesting enough because after 1450 some amazing things happened in the mapping world.....

It is interesting enough!!! :)

We also see the T-in-O pattern in the spheres that Emperor and Empress hold in their hands or on their scepters. The sphere is divided in 3 by the T, in order to represent the three continents Europe, Asia, Africa.

Marco
 

mac22

Rosanne said:
You are sooo right Robert- right up my alley and I will seek it out. I am not eating this month because of the latest book purchases- but what is food compared to Tarot? Many thanks. ~Rosanne

When I get a little money, I buy books, and if any is left I buy
food & clothes. - Desiderius Erasmus

I understand. :D

mac22
 

Rosanne

DoctorArcanus said:
It is interesting enough!!! :)
Thanks Marco- I was thinking more that the actual cards were like a memory aid- not only to learning, but as models for memory, when either telling a story or painting a map. The Hereford Mappamundi that DianaOD speaks of, has an interesting detail. Well there a lots of details, but these made me think of th four ties around the wreath Mandorla in the TdM. It is like a narrative. There is the Garden of Eden, Pillars of Hercules, Babylon and Calvary. Man from the beginning in a Christian sense through the bible to when he leaves and departs through the gates of Heaven (hopefully). So the whole map is an Almanac of sorts. I think it is interesting that in early TdM the wand in the hand of the figure was red- indicating the Red Sea; the head of the figure lies where Jerusalem is on a T-in-O map. I had not thought the globes on the Emperor and Empress as Maps but of course this is symbolically correct and why they held a globe like this in the first place.
Scanned in the Vellum Hereford map. T shape as a figure perhaps with Jerusalem as the head.
~Rosanne
 

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DianeOD

As above

Exactly.