RWS 6 of wands

EvaSegovia

So I'm looking closely at the RWS 6 of wands, and to me it looks like there's something/someone under the horse blanket. One in front, one in the rear. Also,the man at the left looks like he's ready to fight rather than rejoice; and although I can't exactly see the rider's face, he somehow looks resolute. This goes so much against the usual interpretation of victory. Looks more like a Trojan Horse scenario... Does anyone have a take on this?
 

Teheuti

So I'm looking closely at the RWS 6 of wands, and to me it looks like there's something/someone under the horse blanket. One in front, one in the rear. Also,the man at the left looks like he's ready to fight rather than rejoice; and although I can't exactly see the rider's face, he somehow looks resolute. This goes so much against the usual interpretation of victory. Looks more like a Trojan Horse scenario... Does anyone have a take on this?
How does this relate to what's going on in your life right now? -- since you've just recently seen it in the card.

I've seen several of these things on occasion, although it is not the basis of my core meaning of the card. I love the RWS deck partly because I see a card differently depending on my state of mind, what's around the card, the question, the position meaning, subtle or major variations in decks, etc., etc.

BTW, the Trojan Horse was the means of a victory - just not the one that the Trojans had in mind.

You might think about a card as representing an "issue" or concept rather than a set prediction. What is a victory? What's involved in it? - everyone following a leader; a brilliant ploy; the elevation of one idea above the others; a victory march; a wreath or award?

What does the horse think of all this?
 

EvaSegovia

I am SO glad to get your response. I had to reflect on the issue that's going on in my life right now, even though perhaps, I didn't want to see it... I think what it's saying is: someone (King of Wands rx) is hiding something from me that will eventually result in his victory. I'm not sure what he's hiding, or what victory he hopes to attain, but the King of Wands has ALWAYS stood for my husband (now EX). The thing is, I've only recently started reading intuitively, so knowing that all these meanings can appear in one image is Huge! Thank you!
 

EvaSegovia

PS - I'll have to think about what the horse is thinking. I get the picture he's being reigned (roped?) into this
 

Abrac

The bump in the back looks like the horse's rump and possibly the tail. The part in the front looks like the horse's leg taking a step.
 

Barleywine

Interesting thought, I had to go look. The "blanket" is a caparison, part of a warhorse's "barding" or combat armor, but mostly used in parades. Here are a couple of pictures. One of them has the "rump bump" you mentioned. I don't think there's anything more to it than that.
 

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EvaSegovia

I looked at the photos, Barleywine... They're EXACTLY what I was looking at (smile). Still... Now I'm REALLY confused. Should I interpret it as the first or second take?
 

Barleywine

I looked at the photos, Barleywine... They're EXACTLY what I was looking at (smile). Still... Now I'm REALLY confused. Should I interpret it as the first or second take?

Well, the usually fancy and (I assume) heraldic cloth caparison went over the leather-and-metal armor (probably to cover up the blood for the victory parade). I imagine under that green covering in the 6 of Wands, there is armor. Since that first picture shows one of the very few remaining examples of barding, I'm wondering if Pixie had it as a model for the card. There are some remarkable similarities.
 

Teheuti

The image is a simple illustration of a victory march (rather than going off to battle). Similar images are found on many of the illustrative works of the period - especially when illustrating Arthurian themes. To make too much of the details in most of the Minors when establishing core meanings - except as they serve to remind you of those core meanings - is to get off track. However, the details can be extremely important in any individual reading if you use projective techniques—i.e., what the details trigger in the moment that is related to that moment in time.