Sufism

a_shikhs

I am all of a sudden interested in the spiritual path of Sufism. Actually, I wouldn't say all of a sudden but a few years back I had bought this book about Sufism and let it sit on my bookshelf without really reading it. Then today morning, while meditating I got the message to read more about this path and I finally got hold of the book and started reading it. :D
Sufism is connection with the divine through your own spiritual journey and famous Sufi poets like Rumi explain it beautifully in their poems.

Has anyone else ever felt strongly towards Sufism and could shed more light on this? I feel a strong connection here and even though it is a part of Islam (I am Hindu by the way), I just feel that it such a beautiful and a pure path. I am totally against the whole muslim manipulation, terrorism, women inferiority stuff that has destroyed the world, but I just feel the whole essence of Sufism is so sacred and connected to the divine. This is not a topic about the whole muslim bit, but generally about Sufism.

Any insights on this beautiful path would be nice. :)
 

a_shikhs

Reading a few articles online, I came across this:

Sufism: Struggle With One's self

The Sufi struggle with one's self puts further curbs on the Sufi's behaviour and consciousness. Usually this struggle is spoken of as having two dimensions: negation (and affirmation corresponding to the two components of the first shahadah (testification of faith), There is no deity except for God. In reference to the two kinds of effects of the dominance of the selfs mentioned above, the "negation" can be said to take the form of attempting
to control oneself from acting out one's anger or gratifying addictions,
to negate the thought that one will find fulfillment through these means,
to negate the sense that one cannot escape one's depression, and
to give up imagining that God is absent.
The "affirmation" can be said to take the form of embracing and engaging the presence of God in whatever form it may appear within one's consciousness--even in the form of the thoughts that "God is absent," "I am depressed, or "I am distant from God." This unconditional embrace of the presence of God is simply called taslim in Muslim languages. This word is cognate with and is at the root of the word "Islam," and in light of the meaning expressed here, I have translated it as "engaged surrender."
In this regard, the struggle with one's own nafs has been called the greater struggle or greater "holy war" in contrast to the lesser struggle, which is against injustice and oppressors in this world. The concept derives from the popular hadith of the Prophet, in which he said to Muslims returning from a battle, "You have returned from the lesser struggle to the greater struggle." And he was asked, "What is the greater struggle?" He answered, "The struggle against one's self, which is between the two sides of your body." Needless to say, in Sufism these two struggles are mutually reinforcing and occur simultaneously. In particular, the practice of "engaged surrender" in the "greater" struggle with one's own self diminishes certain obstacles in the consciousness of the Sufi, obstacles that--if not stuggled against--will hinder the Sufi's capacity to engage in the "lesser" struggle in their life in the world.



Is this similar to the 'Dark Soul of the Night' concept that one goes through in their spiritual path?
 

gregory

I really like Idries Shah's books about the Incomparable Mullah Nasruddin.... They really make you THINK Sufi...
 

a_shikhs

Thank you for the recommendations. :)

Gregory- I checked the author on amazon. Sounds good, especially her book 'The Way of the Sufi'.

I am currently reading this book called Sufism:The Heart of Islam by Sadia Dehlvi. I like her style of writing and how she states that sufism is so very different to how the modern muslims portray it in today's times and how they have manipulated the teachings to suit it to their needs, which is very true.
 

Anna

I made friends with a Dervish a while ago. He is a wonderful, truly beautiful and inspiring man. When he speaks of his spiritual beliefs, he believes something else is speaking through him, and although my beliefs are completely at odds with what he has to say - to listen to him speaking moves me to tears.

I've taken some whirling workshops with him, and they were brilliant experiences, although pretty intense. I really enjoyed them, and I'd love to do more in the future.

Sufism cannot be separated from Islam, in my opinion, not from what I've experienced of it. When you whirl, you are trying to be a channel for Allah; to open yourself up to receiving Allah's love and then giving all of it away to other people and to the Earth, you keep nothing for yourself.

It is a really beautiful path.
 

Richard

I have several of Shah's books, which are rather shabby and falling apart from overuse. They are crammed full of wisdom, very readable and non-intimidating. Although I haven't thought much about it lately, I have retained a strong affinity to Sufism and probably have unconsciously incorporated a good bit of it into my overall view of life. (Taoism has had a similar influence.)
 

gregory

I have several of Shah's books, which are rather shabby and falling apart from overuse. They are crammed full of wisdom, very readable and non-intimidating. Although I haven't thought much about it lately, I have retained a strong affinity to Sufism and probably have unconsciously incorporated a good bit of it into my overall view of life. (Taoism has had a similar influence.)

I'm SO glad to find someone else who likes them !