Tarocco Bolognese

dminoz

le pendu said:

These sheets are great. The main figures in the Chariot and the World cards... could they be the same? They both have winged helmets, and they both have a victorious, conquering look about them.

One of the variants of the A sequence (the Bolognese one) has the Chariot at number 10, just before the Wheel. This would make the Chariot no.10, conquering the lower plane (i.e. the first series of ten), and the World at no. 20 could be the card of the conquerer/ruler of the higher plane, i.e. the second series of ten -- which would provide a fairly tidy correspondance between the two images.

Just a thought.
 

DoctorArcanus

San Marco: Genesis mosaics

le pendu said:
I found this image when looking for examples of "The Expulsion" (searching for images that relate to the Tower actually), and came across this
http://www.colorado.edu/FRIT/cravenp/Ital3030/Expulsion-venezia.JPG

The only info I can find is that it is from Venice. Looks to me like it is probably one of the mosaics from St Marks.

I assume that it is Adam and Eve, with eve holding a spinner. Then we have another image in the sequence with the seated spinner. I wish I could see more of the image, but can't find it anywhere.

You are right, Robert. This is a mosaic from San Marco.
Here is a different version of the same image:
http://www.basilicasanmarco.it/gallery/mosaici/antico_test/genesi/galleryWAI.bsm?idx=24&lang=ita

This is the image of the whole "Dome of the Genesis" with mosaics representing 26 images of the Genesis:
http://www.basilicasanmarco.it/gallery/mosaici/antico_test/genesi/galleryWAI.bsm

According to the description (in Italian) the mosaics were made in the XIII century (1215-1280)

In the inner circle, the six days of the creation are represented. The image you found is in the external circle (see attachment).
Once again, you found something beatiful and fascinating: thank you! :)

The Precedente (previous) and Successiva (next) links will show you all the other images in the dome....enjoy!

Marco
 

Attachments

  • cupolino.jpg
    cupolino.jpg
    50.9 KB · Views: 132

DoctorArcanus

Venus, Mars, Chariot and World

These Rothschild cards really deserve attention.

About the Time card, I just want to point out that the wings are important too: they suggest that Time flies :)

dminoz said:
The main figures in the Chariot and the World cards... could they be the same? They both have winged helmets, and they both have a victorious, conquering look about them.

Good question. Who are these two figures (or who is this figure)?

About Venus, I also think that she is not riding the Rothschild chariot. I wonder if she is on the Visconti-Sforza chariot. As pointed out by Ross, she is on Mitelli's chariot.
She also appears on a chariot in Boiardo's Deck (see the comment by Viti).
The winged Venus found by Firemaiden is beautiful. On her chariot there is a Star, and I think the Star is the major that is more strongly connected to Venus. She holds an arrow, like Viti's Venus (who is the Queen of Darts).


A number of characters wearing winged helmets appear in the Sola Busca majors. I have no idea of the meaning of the winged helmet in the context of Sola Busca.

Commonly, the winged helmet is one of the attributes of Mercury, but Mercury needs a caduceus, and we have none. Robert M. Place identifies the Rothschild world character as Hermes (i.e. Mercury) but I am not sure he is right. For instance, see the Mantegna Tarot Mercury: a big caduceus, a winged hat (no helmet), no harmour: not so similar to the Rothschild character.

I think the character on the chariot could be Mars (because of the sword).
See this page by Robert O'Neill, which also points out the relevance of the Mars card in the Mantegna Tarot (A-5).

The character in the World card is even more mysterious. I think World characters always are mysterious: Cary-Yale Visconti, "Charles VI", Bodet, Vieville, Grimaud...

Isn't it strange how the sex of the World character varies through the decks and the centuries? Rothschild (M), Cary-Yale Visconti (F), "Charles VI" (F), Vieville (M), Grimaud (F), Mitelli (M), Bodet (F).....

Marco
 

Ross G Caldwell

dminoz said:
One of the variants of the A sequence (the Bolognese one) has the Chariot at number 10, just before the Wheel. This would make the Chariot no.10, conquering the lower plane (i.e. the first series of ten), and the World at no. 20 could be the card of the conquerer/ruler of the higher plane, i.e. the second series of ten -- which would provide a fairly tidy correspondance between the two images.

In my understanding of the meaning of the sequence, the Chariot at 10 - after the Virtues, before the Wheel - would be the best place for it. This sequence occurs in the "Alla Colonna" sheet (see Kaplan I, 134) from 17th century Rome. In this depiction, the figure on the Chariot is almost identical to the figure on the Wheel - it is as if the allegory is saying "The Triumphator looks glorious - but when seen with spiritual eyes, his Chariot of Victory is nothing more than a turn of Fortune's Wheel".

Nevertheless, I am convinced that the original sequence put the Chariot immediately after Love (i.e. as it is in the "standard" A, B, and C orders). This makes it harder to interpret (IMO), but I think the historical evidence constrains us to this sequence.

But in either case, the Chariot remains in the "first 10", and is better there than in the "second 10" after the Wheel, as he is in the Florentine sequence. There I have a hard time making sense of him at all.