Floskaartjes

roppo

head and foot

I had to cut the head and foot margin of my Floskaartjes sheet image to make it not too heavy for the server comp. Threre are some words on both of them and they are simply beyond my understanding. Well, those on foot are the publisher's data, I believe. Who can read them, please read them for the rest of us.
 

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Huck

DianeOD said:
I've chucked that history of card-play into the bin.

Don't ask me its author's name. I'm disgusted.

And what I meant to say was (a) that in quoting his conflation of Seznec with Brockhaus as quoted by Seznec, I was placing undue faith in the secondary author - my error.

and (b) the text of Nicholas of Cusa's written record of his ludus shows just how well it agrees with the form of the Mantegna tarocchi. Personally, given Cusa's background, travels, and acquaintences, I don't see why he couldn't have invented number-games of the "picture-plus-text" variety as early as the 1430s.

But I'm too tired to argue. It's 7am, I'm off to college, and haven't been to bed yet.

Will be back if and when able.

.. :) don't be frustrated ... Cusanus' De Ludo Globi is rather boring stuff, and, as it's a longer text, I couldn't bring myself to read it to its end. Cusanus had greater mathematical talents, that is true, afriend of great mathematicans of the time. But there was not only light, there was also shadow ... In the time, when St. Capistranus was in Germany, Cusanus somewhere (?1454) forbade card playing. In the Ludo Globi he accepts playing (with bowls), but presents it with so much twisting of his words, that it might have been not really funny to do this sport with him.
... and really, not everybody loved him ... in Germany he was partly taken as a traitor, when he appeared as one of the great speakers at Basel in pro-council perspective and did run over to the pope Eugen (really not an easy man, and of doubtable methodes and worth), when he got some promises from this side. Some good hope, which connected to the council of Constance, was stabbed to ground by Cusanus in first line, later by Emperor Fredrick III., who had an open hand, and then the idea of the council was more or less finished ca. 1450. With the result, that there had been some rather crazy popes without controlling opposition for the rest of the century, and a somewhat clearer course of reformation with begin of the 16th century. The church was splitted with all the spend blood, which followed this decision. All this in a time, when actually the energy was needed to defend Europe in its Eastern parts.
.. not everybody loved him.

This story of Brockhaus confused many.
 

Kahlie

roppo said:
I had to cut the head and foot margin of my Floskaartjes sheet image to make it not too heavy for the server comp. Threre are some words on both of them and they are simply beyond my understanding. Well, those on foot are the publisher's data, I believe. Who can read them, please read them for the rest of us.

"Dit zes-en-dertig Kaartspel" says this 36-Card Game, I can't really decipher what the rest says... the other line seems to be "Bedaart de Jonge Jeugd xxx wel", which would mean something along the lines of: "Keeps your young one's quiet/taking it easy" but since I can't decipher one of the words I'm not sure...

The bottom is the publishers info which states:

"t'Amsterdam" (In Amsterdam)
"bij J. Bouwer" (By J. Bouwer)
"op de Fxxx Gracht" (On the Canal xxx), which is the address
"Zuyd-Zijde" (South Side), also part of the address
"In de Bybel-Drukkerije", (In the Bible Publishers)

Hope this helps,

Kahlie

P.S. I replaced words I couldn't decipher with xxx :)
 

spoonbender

Kahlie said:
"Dit zes-en-dertig Kaartspel" says this 36-Card Game, I can't really decipher what the rest says... the other line seems to be "Bedaart de Jonge Jeugd xxx wel"
I'm pretty sure it says: "Dit Zes-en-dertig kaartespel / Behaagt de Jonge Jeugd seer wel." Which would mean: "This Thirty-six card game / Delights the Young Youth very well." (Only it rhymes in Dutch.)

Kahlie said:
"t'Amsterdam" (In Amsterdam)
"bij J. Bouwer" (By J. Bouwer)
"op de Fxxx Gracht" (On the Canal xxx), which is the address
"Zuyd-Zijde" (South Side), also part of the address
"In de Bybel-Drukkerije", (In the Bible Publishers)
Yes, it seems to say: "'tAmsterdam, by J. BOUWER, op de Rooze Gragt, Zuyd-Zyde, in de Bybel-Drukkerye." It probably says 'Rooze' because I had a look online and J. Bouwer bought a house at the 'Rozengracht' ('Rooze Gragt' in old Dutch, 'Roses Canal' in English). I agree with the other translations by Kahlie. :)

Spoon
 

roppo

Oh, thank you Kahlie! Thank you Spoonbender. Now I can write a thing or two on Floskaartjes at my website, an indtroductory file in Japanese. Those European ephemeral prints are almost unknown in my country and Japanese friends will surely get interested in them.
 

DianeOD

Floskaartjes as 'memento mori'

re: 'lessons' ...

I was thinking of the genre called "Estates satires".

The form begins as another angle on the 'joc partits' kind of poem, but is more satyrical. The style lasts up until the 19th C in moral poems.

Here's how one of them begins:
All kinds of people, those of every rank and every estate, work hard to be wicked ...

Here is a bishop. Wealthy with his own goods and those of his people, he leads the way. Because of him, there is a heavy burden of sin and his high throne brings him severe punishment.

Here is a king. Ranting, tyrannical, he favours some men while oppressing others and, what is worse, he is a lion to the meek, but a lamb to the extortionate.

Here is a parish priest. A priest ought to be a helpful path towards goodness, but the path he offers is not helpful but tearful, even for himself. Here is a cleric. He makes the wrong moral choices, he does not control himself, his mind dwells on sinful things. He knows what he ought to do, but he does not do it. He exchanges good for evil.

Here is a knight. He bears arms, he rages, he strikes, he brandishes his lance. He walks through the camp, suffocating everything. He is like the horned people of Cyprus.

Here is a nobleman. He is puffed up. Since he is fearless himself, he is feared by others. Confident of his power, which is like huge, curved horns, he respects nothing.

Here is a judge. His judgements are for sale. He loves money. His decrees are unjust. He helps the rich but he grimly obstructs the poor. Here is a merchant. He travels around the markets at home and overseas. He praises the goods he has to sell. He approves of his own goods, but he rejects yours and so he cheats you.

Here is a farmer. He sows and gathers crops. He hides the first fruits and avoids paying his tithes, saving himself money.

for the rest see http://www.prosentient.com.au/balnaves/johnbalnaves/dissch3.asp